Top 5 Fruits for Weight Loss

It’s no secret that fruit is a smart part of a healthy diet. When a snack attack hits, pay a visit to your fruit bowl. Whatever’s in there is likely to be better for you than the contents of your pantry.

But are all fruits created equal? Here's a look at the best fruits if you’re trying to lose weight.

1

Apples

apples

Verywell / Alexandra Shytsman

Apples are a common favorite. They're the ultimate snack: filling, juicy, crunchy, and portable. A review published in 2017 suggests that including apples in your diet could help with weight loss —not surprising, considering they’re chock-full of fiber, a nutrient that’s known to boost feelings of fullness and ward off hunger pangs.

There are plenty of ways to get your daily dose of apple: Chow down on a whole Fuji (apples are such a packable snack), add pieces to your oatmeal, throw slices into a salad, bake some with your chicken, or cook up a low-cal dessert. 

1 large apple: 116 calories, 5g fiber

2

Watermelon

watermelon

Verywell / Alexandra Shytsman

Watermelon is a double whammy: It’s low in calories with a high water content. This means you can eat two entire cups of watermelon for less than 100 calories and your stomach will feel like you’ve eaten more because the fruit is more than 90 percent water. Staying hydrated helps you feel full.

If you’re looking to lower your daily calorie intake, incorporating watermelon into your diet is a smart move. Munch on it whenever you feel the urge to snack. This way, you’ll avoid higher-calorie foods and satisfy your sweet tooth.

2 cups diced watermelon: 90 calories, 1g fiber

3

Raspberries

raspberries

Verywell / Alexandra Shytsman

Raspberries are small but mighty! These babies are low in calories, and even lower when you consider that they’re high in insoluble (indigestible) fiber.

When you eat a 52-calorie cup of raspberries, you’re really only digesting about 32 calories. Put that together with the fact that raspberries have the highest fiber content of any fruit (1 cup = 7g fiber), and we’ve got a weight-loss winner.

1 cup raspberries: 64 calories, 8g fiber 

4

Grapefruit

Grapefruit

Verywell / Alexandra Shytsman

Grapefruit gives you a lot of bang for your calorie buck. Half of a medium grapefruit has only 60 calories, and, like watermelon, it’s more than 90 percent water.

Plus, a study published in 2014 showed that a compound in grapefruit called naringin could lower blood sugar and ultimately lead to weight loss. So enjoy some grapefruit at every opportunity—squeeze it into your water, throw some wedges into your salad, or use it like lemon to flavor your food.

Consuming grapefruit with certain medications could have adverse health effects. If you’re on any meds, check with your doctor before adding grapefruit to your diet.

1/2 of a medium grapefruit: 40 calories, 1.5g fiber

5

Oranges

Oranges

Verywell / Alexandra Shytsman

If grapefruit isn’t your go-to citrus pick, you’re in luck. Oranges are an amazing weight-loss fruit too. High in fiber and water content, they’ll help you feel full.

Another great thing about oranges? There is almost always a variety in season and there’s no shortage of ways to add the fruit to your diet. Eat a whole orange as a snack or use mandarin orange segments in salads. 

1 medium orange: 61 calories, 3g fiber

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Article Sources

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  1. Asgary S, Rastqar A, Keshvari M. Weight Loss Associated With Consumption of Apples: A Review. J Am Coll Nutr. 2018;37(7):627-639. doi:10.1080/07315724.2018.1447411

  2. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service. FoodData Central, 2019. 

  3. Alam MA, Subhan N, Rahman MM, Uddin SJ, Reza HM, Sarker SD. Effect of citrus flavonoids, naringin and naringenin, on metabolic syndrome and their mechanisms of action. Adv Nutr. 2014;5(4):404-17. doi:10.3945/an.113.005603