Realalt 3DTriSport Walking 3D Pedometer Review

A stand-alone pedometer for people who want to keep things simple

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4.2

Realalt 3DTriSport Walking 3D Pedometer

Realalt 3DTriSport Walking 3D Pedometer

Verywell Fit / Ashley Mateo

What We Like
  • Very affordable

  • No need for a smartphone

  • Super accurate step count

What We Don't Like
  • Too bulky and not secure

  • Data resets after 24 hours

  • No way to view activity trends

Bottom Line

If you’re looking for the bare minimum when it comes to data (and budget!), the Realalt 3DTriSport Walking 3D Pedometer is a seriously accurate step counter.

4.2

Realalt 3DTriSport Walking 3D Pedometer

Realalt 3DTriSport Walking 3D Pedometer

Verywell Fit / Ashley Mateo

Not into all the bells and whistles (and the price tags) that come with fancy activity trackers? The Realalt 3DTriSport Walking 3D Pedometer is as simple as it gets without skimping on accuracy. We tested the device, which can be clipped onto your pants or the strap of a bag and registers your steps taken, distance covered, and active calories burned throughout the day—all for an extremely low price. Read on to find out if this is the best way for you to be tracking your steps.

Realalt 3DTriSport Walking 3D Pedometer
Verywell Fit / Ashley Mateo

Performance: Superior step tracking

Using data collected by its internal accelerometer, which relies on the latest 3D Tri-Axis Sensor Technology, the Realalt 3DTriSport Walking 3D Pedometer tracks steps, distance, active calories burned, and that’s it. But, really, what else can you ask of a pedometer

Thanks to its 10-step error prevention feature, the device keeps random non-walking motions from being recorded—so no more shaking your wrist while watching Netflix on the couch to hit your daily step quota. To me, that’s a good thing. For the device to engage, you need to take 10 continuous steps. Those steps are then counted retroactively as long as you keep moving. I found my step count using the pedometer was outnumbered those recorded by my Apple Watch and Fitbit, which I wore simultaneously for several days—and that makes sense, because I’m definitely guilty of waving my wrist around to record enough movement to register my standing activity for the hour.

Daily counts for steps taken, distance covered, calories burned, and total activity time all reset at midnight every day.

Without a partner app, the device doesn’t offer a wealth of data. Daily counts for steps taken, distance covered, calories burned, and total activity time all reset at midnight every day, so there’s no tracking patterns or habits over time like you would with, say, a Fitbit. While using this device, I was able to see my total step count from the previous day and how the current day compared, as well as the 30-day total, but that’s it. If you’re looking for a pedometer that provides in-depth activity trend data, this one isn’t it. On the plus side, I wasn’t constantly turning to my smartphone to see how close I was to my daily step goal.

Realalt 3DTriSport Walking 3D Pedometer
Verywell Fit / Ashley Mateo

Design/Comfort: Too much bulk is a risk

This pedometer is designed with simplicity in mind, and I liked that all my real-time info was clearly displayed in large text right on the LCD screen. Using the three buttons on the right side, you can cycle through the different tracking categories and set or erase daily totals and activity goals.

This pedometer is designed with simplicity in mind, and all your real-time info is clearly displayed in large text right on the LCD screen.

The one major problem? The device comes with significant bulk compared to sleek wrist trackers, and, chances are, if it’s clipped to your pocket or bag, it’s going to get knocked off at one point or another. I nearly lost it twice in crowded subway stations. The clip is removable, and the device does come with a lanyard, but wearing a sizeable pedometer around your neck isn’t really the best look. 

Realalt 3DTriSport Walking 3D Pedometer
Verywell Fit / Ashley Mateo

Setup Process: Couldn’t be simpler

Setting up the Realalt 3DTriSport Walking 3D Pedometer took me under 10 minutes. However, you should have some information prepared beforehand because the device will exit the setup mode after 10 seconds if you don’t do anything. You’ll want to know the time, your weight, and height before powering it up, and you should have also measured your stride length. 

The device prevents random non-walking motions from being recorded—so no more shaking your wrist while watching Netflix on the couch to hit your daily step quota.

I found this super easy to do; it’s explained within the user manual—just take 10 steps, measure the distance from start to finish, then divide by 10—or you can use the average lengths of 30 inches for men and 26 inches for women (obviously, if you actually calculate your own stride length, the devices data will be more accurate). 

Realalt 3DTriSport Walking 3D Pedometer
Verywell Fit / Ashley Mateo

Battery: Lasts up to a year with auto power saving

There’s no charging necessary with the Realalt 3DTriSport Walking 3D Pedometer; the device automatically enters standby mode to save battery life when you’re not in motion. It’s powered by a lithium metal battery that lasts up to a year, and, after that, you can easily screw off the battery cap and replace the battery. 

Price: A competitively priced budget option

Pedometers can range from $15 (the Omron Alvita Optimized Pedometer to $28 (for the Xiaomi Mi Band 3 Fitness Tracker) to $449 (for the Apple Watch). If you’re sticking to a budget, you’re better off with a standalone device like the Realalt 3DTriSport Walking 3D Pedometer; when you start looking at wristbands, the price is likely to jump—but you may be willing to pay more for the additional info that comes with most expensive devices.  

Competition: Solidly in the budget category

The Realalt 3DTriSport Walking 3D Pedometer falls into the same budget category as the Omron Alvita Optimized Pedometer; the OZO Fitness SC2 Digital, which is also priced at $19.99; and the 3DFitBud Simple Step Counter Walking 3D Pedometer. But both the Omron and the OZO store up to seven days of information and may be better for those more interested in seeing how their activity trends look over at least a week.

Final Verdict

Yes, buy it.

Though pretty simplistic, the Realalt 3DTriSport Walking 3D Pedometer is an accurate and affordable pedometer for those who don’t want to rely on a smartphone for their step-tracking needs.

Specs

  • Product Name 3DTriSport Walking 3D Pedometer
  • Product Brand Realalt
  • Price $39.72
  • Weight 1.44 oz.
  • Product Dimensions 3 x 1.3 x 4 in.
  • Color Gray/Black, Magenta, Stealth Black, White
  • Battery 1 lithium metal battery
  • What’s Included removable clip, lanyard, and battery
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