8 Best Gluten-Free Pizza Crusts to Buy in 2018

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If you've gone gluten-free but still want to enjoy the pleasure of a home-baked pizza, these gluten-free crusts will be the answer to your culinary dreams. Each is prepared to the strictest gluten-free standards and tested to ensure that glutens are kept to anywhere from 20 to less than five parts per million (ppm).

Simply pull one out the freezer, add your favorite gluten-free toppings, and pop into the oven for a delicious snack or meal. Even your non-gluten-free friends will love them.

Our Top Picks

Udi's Gluten-Free Pizza Crusts

Udi's gluten-free pizza crusts come in a handy two-pack and are made with a combination of tapioca starch, brown rice flour, potato starch, yeast, and eggs.

The entire Udi's food line is certified by the Gluten-Free Certification Organization (GFCO) which tests to 10 ppm of gluten. As an added bonus, their gluten-free pizza crusts also are kosher.

Three Bakers Thin Pizza Shell

Three Bakers offers an eight-inch, thin pizza crust made with rice flour, tapioca starch, cornstarch, yeast, eggs, and milk powder. The crusts have a less sweet taste than other gluten-free brand and tested to contain less than five ppm of gluten.

Three Bakers crusts are shipped in a handy two-pack.

Joan's GF Great Bakes Pizza Crusts

Joan's GF Great Bakes offers their New York-style pizza crust, delivered frozen and ready for your favorite gluten-free toppings. The handmade crust measures 10 inches in diameter and has the chew end density of a traditional New York-style pizza.

The company tests its products through an independent lab which confirms less than 5ppm of gluten per crust.

Gillian's Foods Gluten-Free Pizza Dough

Gillian's Foods offers both a pre-rolled, nine-inch gluten-free pizza crust and a roll-it-yourself version for those wanting to toss their own dough. Both are dairy-free and contain white rice flour, tapioca flour, egg whites, and soy oil.

The pre-rolled and roll-it-yourself products are shipped frozen and come 12 to a pack.

Glutino's Premium Pizza Crusts

Glutino's premium pizza crusts come four to a pack and are made with cornstarch, tapioca starch, yeast, eggs, and a trace of sesame and soy. In addition to their crusts, Glutino's offers pre-made pizzas topped with either pepperoni, two cheeses, or spinach and feta.

Glutino tests its products to contain less than 20 ppm of gluten.

Katz Gluten-Free Pizza Crust

Katz gluten-free pizza crusts come in either a five- or 10-inch size and are made with brown rice flour, tapioca flour, soy flour, and yeast. They are made in a dedicated gluten-free factory without any eggs, nuts, sugar, or dairy.

The Katz crusts are individually wrapped and shipped in a handy four-pack.

Kinnikinnick Personal-Size Pizza Crusts

Kinnikinnick Foods offer four-packs of their square, gluten-free pizza crusts in personal-size portions. The crusts are made with sweet rice flour, tapioca starch, cornmeal, eggs, and yeast.

The University of Nebraska's nutrition lab has certified Kinnikinnick products to contain less than five ppm of gluten. The pizza crusts are also kosher and free of any tree nuts, peanuts, or dairy.

Whole Foods Bakehouse Pizza Crust

The Whole Foods supermarket chain offers a frozen gluten-free pizza crust as part of the company's Glutenfree Bakehouse line. The pizza crusts are made with non-fat milk, tapioca starch, white bean flour, sorghum flour, and yeast.

The Glutenfree Bakehouse products are made in a dedicated gluten-free facility. A dedicated, in-house lab tests to below five ppm of gluten.

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