10 Foods That Are High in Vitamin K

Green vegetables

Verywell / Jiaqi Zhou

Vitamin K refers to a group of fat soluble vitamins that are linked to heart health, longevity, and other benefits. It is also needed for many functions in the body, such as blood clotting, bone development, and protecting against heart disease.

The two most common types of vitamin K include vitamin K1 and vitamin K2

Vitamin K1 is mainly found in plant-based foods like leafy green vegetables and accounts for the vast majority of vitamin K sources in the human diet.

Vitamin K2 is primarily found in animal products like pork and cheese. It is also available in some fermented foods like natto, sauerkraut, pickles, and pickled vegetables.

Why You Need Vitamin K

Vitamin K is mainly known for its important role in blood clotting, which helps to prevent excessive bleeding. People who have blood clotting disorders or take blood thinning medications should monitor their intake of vitamin K.

Getting enough vitamin K in your diet can also contribute to heart health. This is because vitamin K prevents calcium buildup in your arteries, which could increase the risk of heart disease.

Like calcium, vitamin K is associated with bone health. Adequate intake of vitamin K can reduce the risk of bone fractures, while deficiency in vitamin K can lead to bleeding problems.

The recommended amount of vitamin K depends on sex and age. The recommended amount for adult men and women is 120 mcg and 90 mcg, respectively.

Here are some of the best food sources of vitamin K to consider adding to your meals.

Kale

Kale

Verywell / Alexandra Shytsman 

One cup of cooked kale provides 544 mcg of vitamin K.

Kale is a dark leafy green that has been labeled as a superfood since it is among the most nutritious foods per calorie. It is low in calories, fat, and carbohydrates, making it a popular source of vitamins and minerals for various types of diets.

Cooking kale will reduce the volume and allow you to eat more per serving, though you can also consume raw kale for the vitamin K content. 

Brussels Sprouts

Brussels Sprouts

Verywell / Alexandra Shytsman

One cup of cooked brussels sprouts contains 285 mcg of vitamin K.

Brussels sprouts are hearty, cruciferous vegetables that are rich in nutrients and antioxidants, including vitamin K. They may get a bad reputation among children, but people are often surprised by the appetizing flavor. 

An easy way to incorporate brussels sprouts into your diet is to slice them thin for salads or roast them for a savory side dish.

Broccoli

Broccoli

Verywell / Alexandra Shytsman

One cup of cooked broccoli contains 164 mcg of vitamin K.

Broccoli is a nutritious vegetable that is associated with many health benefits. Since it is low in calories, it is a popular source of nutrients for those following a low-calorie diet geared toward healthy weight loss. Broccoli is also associated with diabetes management, better heart health, and reduced risk of cancer.

Asparagus

Asparagus

Verywell / Alexandra Shytsman

One cup of cooked asparagus contains 80 mcg of vitamin K.

Asparagus spears are a popular vegetable, especially for grilling at summer barbecues. They not only taste delicious, they are also full of nutrients like folate, fiber, and vitamin K. Asparagus also contains a moderate amount of protein, which is convenient for vegans and vegetarians.

Cabbage

Cabbage

Verywell / Alexandra Shytsman

One cup of cooked cabbage contains 118 mcg of vitamin K.

Cabbage is an underrated vegetable. It is low in calories, carbohydrates, and fat. It is also low on the glycemic index and suitable for a low-FODMAP diet.

If you needed another reason to cook up some cabbage soup, you might want to stock up on cabbage for the nutrient density. For those looking to add foods rich in vitamin K to your diet, a serving of cabbage may cover your daily needs.

Green Snap Beans

Green beans

Verywell / Alexandra Shytsman

One cup of cooked green snap beans contains 60 mcg of vitamin K.

Green beans are affordable, easy to find, and full of nutrients. You can buy them fresh, frozen, or canned at most grocery stores. 

While green bean recipes are most popular during the holiday months, you can enjoy green snap beans at any point of the year.

Kiwi

Kiwi

Verywell / Alexandra Shytsman

One cup of raw kiwi fruit contains 72.5 mcg of vitamin K.

Though most of the foods that are highest in vitamin K are dark leafy greens and green vegetables, fruits are also a source of vitamin K. Kiwi is one of the fruits with the most potent amount of vitamin K.

Like other fruits, kiwi is an excellent source of vitamins and minerals. It contains ample vitamin C, vitamin K, vitamin E, potassium, folate, and more. Kiwis are also associated with reduced inflammation.

Collard Greens

Collard greens

Verywell / Alexandra Shytsman 

One cup of cooked collard greens contains 609 mcg of vitamin K.

Like other leafy greens, collards are one of the richest dietary sources of vitamin K. Fortunately, collard greens are a delicious way to eat more of this vital nutrient. 

Collard greens are also a great source of carotenoids like lutein, beta-carotene, and zeaxanthin, which have impressive antioxidant abilities.

Spinach

Spinach

Verywell / Alexandra Shytsman

One cup of cooked spinach contains 1,020 mcg of vitamin K.

This is well over the recommended amounts for adult men and women, making spinach one of the most potent sources of dietary vitamin K.

Since spinach cooks down, it is easy to eat plenty of spinach and take advantage of its impressive nutrition profile.

Spinach is also an excellent source of plant-based protein for vegans and vegetarians.

Turnip Greens

turnip greens

Getty Images/ Riccardo Bruni / EyeEm 

One cup of cooked turnip greens contains 531 mcg of vitamin K.

Turnip greens have a bitter taste when consumed raw but it becomes milder once cooked. Trying some turnip green recipes is worth it since this leafy green vegetable contains more than twice the recommended amount of vitamin K per day.

It is also a rich source of other nutrients, including vitamin C, calcium, manganese, potassium, and more.

A Word From Verywell

Dark leafy green are among the most potent dietary sources of vitamin K. Other foods that are high in vitamin K include fruits like kiwi fruit and vegetables like asparagus, broccoli, and more.

Since vitamin K is associated with heart health, bone strength, and other health benefits, it is recommended to consume foods that are high in this nutrient. For maximum absorption, combine vitamin K sources with healthy fats.

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14 Sources
Verywell Fit uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.
  1. Vitamin K Fact Sheet for Health Professionals. National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements. Published 2021.

  2. J DiNicolantonio J, Bhutani J, H O'Keefe J. The Health Benefits of Vitamin K. Mol Biotechnol. 2015;3(1):75-75. doi:10.1007/bf02821338

  3. What is Vitamin K Deficiency Bleeding?. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Published 2021. 

  4. Vitamin K Fact Sheet for Consumers. National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements. Published 2021.

  5. Kale, fresh, cooked, no added fat. USDA FoodData Central. Published 10/30/2020

  6. Brussels sprouts, fresh, cooked, no added fat. USDA FoodData Central. Published 10/30/2020

  7. Broccoli, fresh, cooked, no added fat. USDA FoodData Central. Published 10/30/2020

  8. Asparagus, fresh, cooked, no added fat. USDA FoodData Central. Published 10/30/2020

  9. Cabbage, green, cooked, no added fat. USDA FoodData Central. Published 10/30/2020

  10. Beans, snap, green, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt. USDA FoodData Central. Published 4/1/2019

  11. Kiwi fruit, raw. USDA FoodData Central. Published 10/30/2020

  12. Collards, fresh, cooked, no added fat. USDA FoodData Central. Published 10/30/2020

  13. Spinach, fresh, cooked, no added fat. USDA FoodData Central. Published 10/30/2020

  14. Turnip greens, fresh, cooked, no added fat. USDA FoodData Central. Published 10/30/2020