Fitbit Aria 2 Wi-Fi Smart Scale Review

A modern scale to track your weight, body fat, and more

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3.8

Fitbit Aria 2 Wi-Fi Smart Scale

Fitbit Aria 2 Wi-Fi Smart Scale
Verywell Fit / Joline Buscemi
What We Like
  • Sleek design

  • Easy setup

  • Information stays private

  • Pairs well with app

What We Don't Like
  • Not as informative as other scales

  • Expensive

Bottom Line

The Fitbit Aria 2 Wi-Fi Smart Scale is an attractive-looking scale that easily pairs with phones and effectively tracks fitness goals. However, compared to other options, it may not be worth the cost unless you’re already a Fitbit user.

3.8

Fitbit Aria 2 Wi-Fi Smart Scale

Fitbit Aria 2 Wi-Fi Smart Scale
Verywell Fit / Joline Buscemi

We purchased the Fitbit Aria 2 Wi-Fi Smart Scale so our reviewer could thoroughly test and assess it. Keep reading for our full product review.

The Fitbit Aria 2 Wi-Fi Smart Scale measures weight, body fat percentage, lean mass, and BMI. Paired with the Fitbit app, up to eight users can privately track their fitness progress, set goals, and keep up with their health data. The Aria 2 offers only minor changes to the original Aria, including an easier setup and a larger weight capacity of 400 pounds. We tested out the smart scale and compared it to similar bathroom scales on the market to decide if the Fitbit Aria 2 is worth the approximately $130 price tag.

Setup Process: Easy, step-by-step instructions

Setting up the scale is easy, especially if you already have the Fitbit app. If not, you’ll need to download the app (it’s available in both the Apple and Android app store for free) and create an account, a process that takes all of five minutes. 

From there, you’ll use your phone to connect to the scale via Bluetooth. Input your Wi-Fi password, and follow the prompts to connect the scale. This is also when you’ll choose an icon to represent yourself on the scale, which will display on the scale’s screen instead of your name.

Fitbit Aria 2 Wi-Fi Smart Scale
Verywell Fit / Joline Buscemi 

Design: Sleek materials and interface

The Fitbit Aria 2 is an attractive scale you’ll feel okay leaving out in view. The top is made of sleek tempered glass, available in either black or white, with a slightly mirrored surface. We were worried that this material would leave behind footprints and end up looking dirty, but it stayed smudge-free. It is prone to showing dust, however, and you’ll need to wipe it down occasionally to keep it looking clean.

If you want to keep the scale in the bathroom, you can do so without fear of water damage. It’s designed to work in a humid bathroom environment, so condensation will not damage it. Just don’t drip large amounts of water on it and never completely submerge the scale.

Using the scale is fun, with its semi-interactive user experience. The LCD display uses a moving footprint graphic to instruct you on and off the scale, and after displaying your weight and body fat percentage, your chosen icon will appear to show that it’s recognized you as the user. (If it isn’t sure about the identity of a user, it will ask him or her to verify by stepping on the side of the scale corresponding with an X or a checkmark.)

Though the look of the scale is important, you’ll probably find yourself on the app more than you will on the scale. There, you can track your weight changes through charts, which are equally simple in design and easy to understand. But unless you use other features of the app, like calorie tracking or if you have a Fitbit activity tracker, the app may look sparse.

Fitbit Aria 2 Wi-Fi Smart Scale
Verywell Fit / Joline Buscemi 

Performance: Just what you need to track fitness progress

The scale measures weight and body fat percentage and pairs seamlessly with the app to track your lean mass and body mass index (BMI). To measure body fat percentage, the Fitbit Aria 2 uses bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), which sends a completely undetectable electrical signal through your body and measures the amount of time it takes that signal to return back to the scale. The signal moves slower through fat, and it uses this to measure fat mass in the body. Bioimpedance devices are considered accurate and safe, but those with pacemakers are advised not to use them. Fitbit also advises against use by those who are pregnant, although other scales like the Nokia Body+ have pregnancy modes.

Outside of the brand name—and especially if you aren’t already a Fitbit user—the Fitbit Aria 2 smart scale just doesn’t have the features to justify the cost.

After weighing yourself, the data is sent to the Fitbit app via Wi-Fi. We found that this information didn’t always make it to the app right away, even after refreshing several times. Once the information is transmitted to the app, the graphs are easy to understand. There are graphs that track weight trends, lean mass versus fat, body fat percentage, and BMI. You can further break those down to weekly, monthly, yearly, or full progress. By knowing these numbers—and by watching them change—users will be able to track their health more accurately. For example, watching how your weight changes along with your body fat percentage can give you insight into whether you’re gaining muscle or not.

Precision: Good enough

One of the most important questions when it comes to a scale: Does it work? When compared to other scales with similar capabilities, the results were always slightly off but never by more than a pound or a percentage point. In some instances, our weight or fat percentage would be slightly changed even a minute later. But because the differences were so small, we believe this scale is still precise enough to track long-term changes.

Fitbit Aria 2 Wi-Fi Smart Scale
Verywell Fit / Joline Buscemi 

Compatibility: A smartphone and Wi-Fi are necessary

This is a smart scale, which means it needs a few more connections than your typical scale. First, you’ll need an iPhone 4S or later, iPad 3rd generation or later, or a leading Android or Windows device to connect. The phone needs to have Bluetooth, and you’ll also need Wi-Fi in order to sync the scale with your phone and chart your measurements. The scale will recognize up to eight users based on weight and body composition. Guests can use the scale without a problem; it just won’t sync to the app. 

You can only use the Fitbit app with the Aria 2—unfortunately, Fitbit does not integrate with Apple’s HealthKit nor most other apps, so keep that in mind. Also note that while it isn’t necessary to have a Fitbit tracker, it does enhance the experience of using the app by giving you a fuller view of your fitness activity. Because the Fitbit tracker can count steps and record workouts, it’s easy to see how your activity influences the numbers on the scale. We also felt more motivated to reach our workout goals when we had the whole ecosystem of the Fitbit app to encourage us. After a week of tracking a new weightlifting routine through our Fitbit Charge 3, we were able to stand on the scale and see a small jump in muscle mass, which is all the encouragement we needed to keep going.

Additional Features: Just an app away

While the scale itself will only tell you your weight and body fat percentage, you’ll find more features within the Fitbit app. For example, if you set a weight or body fat goal, the app can help you reach it. Using the Fitbit food tracker (available within the app), you’ll be able to watch how many calories you’re taking in. And if you have a Fitbit fitness tracker, you’ll be able to track exercise, too.

Fitbit Aria 2 Wi-Fi Smart Scale
Verywell Fit / Joline Buscemi 

Battery: Good for a year

The Fitbit Aria 2 uses three AA batteries, which are already included and installed upon purchase. The user manual says that the batteries typically have a life of one year, but it will vary based on your individual usage and the types of batteries you use. You’ll be able to see how much battery is left within the Fitbit app.

Price: Steep for a scale

The Fitbit Aria 2 retails for $129.95. While it has a brand name to back up the high cost, there are several other smart scales that provide the same information as the Aria 2—sometimes even more—at a significantly lower price. We found similar scales for under $50, though they do not have the same extensive app experience as the Fitbit.

While it has a range of features and a brand name to back it up, there are several other smart scales that provide the same information as the Aria 2—sometimes more—for a significantly lower price. You can find smart scales on the market for under $50, but many do not come with the extensive app experience and brand name as Fitbit.

Fitbit Aria 2 Wi-Fi Smart Scale
Verywell Fit / Joline Buscemi 

Fitbit Area 2 Wi-Fi Smart Scale vs. Withings Body+ Body Composition Wi-Fi Scale

The Withings (previously Nokia) Body+ is another Wi-Fi digital scale that also pairs with your smartphone and measures via bioimpedance analysis. However, the Body+ actually does more than the Fitbit Aria 2, and at a lower price of around $100. 

Additionally, the Body+ measures body water percentage and muscle and bone mass and has features to track pregnancy and your baby’s weight. All of the information is uploaded to the Health Mate app. While less comprehensive than the Fitbit app, Health Mate does connect with other health-based apps.

Final Verdict

Go for it, Fitbit fans!

If you already own a Fitbit fitness tracker, then the Fitbit Aria 2 Wi-Fi Smart Scale is a solid choice. It works easily and accurately, pairs well with the Fitbit app, and is a joy to use. However, for non-Fitbit users, the smart scale just doesn’t have the features to justify the cost. Other options offer more at a lower price. 

Specs

  • Product Name Aria 2
  • Product Brand Fitbit
  • Price $129.95
  • Weight 4.7 lbs.
  • Product Dimensions 12.3 x 12.3 x 1.3 in.
  • Color Black, white
  • Material Tempered glass, ABS
  • Battery Life Approximately 1 year
  • Warranty 1 year, limited
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