Celery Juice Nutrition Facts

Calories, Carbs, and Health Benefits of Celery Juice

Green celery smoothie
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Celery juice has gained popularity as a health tonic that can provide weight loss benefits, boost energy during workouts, and even improve the appearance of your skin. But celery juice nutrition varies greatly depending on the ingredients in your drink. Some celery juice recipes and products sold in stores contain more than just celery. 

Nutrition Facts

Celery Juice Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 1 cup (8 ounces) 
Per Serving% Daily Value*
Calories 42 
Calories from Fat 0 
Total Fat   0g 
Saturated Fat    0g  0%
Polyunsaturated Fat  0g 
Monounsaturated Fat  0g    
Cholesterol 0mg0%
Sodium  215mg9%
Potassium 670mg14%
Carbohydrates 9g27%
Dietary Fiber 4g0%
Sugars 6g 
Protein 2g 
Vitamin A 9% · Vitamin C 19%
Calcium 10% · Iron 6%
*Based on a 2,000 calorie diet

Carbs in Celery Juice

The calories in celery juice come almost entirely from carbohydrate. But the number of carbs in celery juice will depend on the brand that you buy or the recipe that you use to make it. Many commercially prepared celery juice drinks are actually blends made from several different types of juice.

For example, many single-serving celery juice beverages available online include apple, cucumber, cilantro, spinach, and lemons or limes. These fruits and vegetables add sweetness and flavor to the drink, which can be bland and bitter if celery is the only ingredient. One green celery juice blend produced by The Foundation of Juice contains 120 calories and 29 grams of carbohydrate, 23 grams of sugar and less than one gram of fiber.

The carbohydrates in celery juice or celery juice blends come primarily from naturally-occuring sugar. There are 6 grams of sugar in a cup of celery juice.

As a basis for comparison, one cup of raw celery contains 2 grams of sugar, according to USDA sources. Since the juice is made from several cups of celery, your sugar intake will be higher when you drink juice. 

You may also benefit from fiber when you drink celery juice, however, the amount of fiber will depend on how the drink is made.

USDA data indicates that celery juice provides 4 grams of fiber, but many juicing machines remove the pulp from fruits and vegetables to make the drink. Fiber is contained in this thick pulpy part of the beverage.

The glycemic index of celery is zero. The estimated glycemic load (GL) of raw celery is also zero. Glycemic load takes into account the serving size of a give food or beverage to estimate the food's impact on your blood sugar. It is considered to be more helpful than just using glycemic index for people who are choosing foods based on their effects on blood glucose. The estimated glycemic load of celery juice may be slightly higher than it is for celery, because the fiber may be removed depending on how it is made. 

Fats in Celery Juice

There is no fat in celery or in celery juice. Even if your celery juice is made commercially with other ingredients, it is not likely that you'll get fat from drinking the beverage as most fruits and vegetables that are combined with celery contain zero grams of fat.

Protein in Celery Juice

There may be up to two grams of protein in a single serving of celery juice made at home or made commercially.

Micronutrients in Celery Juice

Whole raw celery contains certain vitamins and minerals.

So the juice will most likely provide these micronutrients when you drink it. If the beverage is a blend, you'll likely benefit from additional vitamins and minerals depending on the ingredients.

One serving of plain celery juice provides a whopping 99 percent of your recommended daily intake of vitamin K, a fat-soluble vitamin that helps with blood clotting functions in the body. You'll also benefit from 14 mg of vitamin C, or 19 percent of your total recommended daily intake if you consume a 2,000 calorie per day diet. And you'll get 16 percent of your daily recommended intake of vitamin B6 in a single, one-cup serving of celery juice.

You'll benefit from 0.2 grams of riboflavin or 15 percent of your daily target and you'll get 9 percent of your recommended intake of vitamin A

Notable minerals contained in celery juice include calcium (99 mg or 10 percent of your recommended daily intake) and potassium (670 mg or 14 percent of daily needs). The juice also provides small amounts of copper, magnesium, iron, and phosphorus.

Health Benefits

Fans of celery juice say that the beverage is a do-it-all tonic that can provide countless health and beauty benefits. 

For example, celebrities who promote the beverage say that it aids weight loss, boosts energy during workouts, and helps your skin to look radiant and healthy. There is some research to support these claims, although experts are cautious about recommending any single beverage as a do-it-all answer to good nutrition.

Celery juice provides a healthy dose of vitamin C. Our bodies do not synthesize vitamin C so eating foods with vitamin C (L-ascorbic acid) is essential for good bone structure, cartilage, muscle, and blood vessels. Vitamin C also aids in the absorption of iron and promotes wound healing.

Vitamin C may also provide more important medical benefits although scientists are still exploring the extent of the benefits. According to the National Institutes of Health, "ongoing research is examining whether vitamin C, by limiting the damaging effects of free radicals through its antioxidant activity, might help prevent or delay the development of certain cancers, cardiovascular disease, and other diseases in which oxidative stress plays a causal role."

The fiber in celery and celery juice may boost your weight loss efforts. Fiber helps your body feel full and satisfied so that you avoid mindless or unnecessary snacking. Fiber also boosts digestive health and may promote healthier cholesterol levels. 

The greatest health benefit from celery juice comes from vitamin K, an important vitamin that helps with blood clotting. While everyone benefits from blood clotting functions, people who are on blood thinners are advised to get enough vitamin K. The vitamin is also important for healthy bones. People who don't get enough vitamin K are at a higher risk for osteoporosis.

Common Questions

What should I look for when purchasing celery for juice?

Almost every market and grocery store sells celery. Many stores sell pre-trimmed, pre-washed, packaged celery for convenience. However, this may not be the most economical choice if you are using celery for juice. Since you use the entire stalk for the drink, there is no reason to pay extra to have it removed.

Look for celery that is crisp, bright green, and free from blemishes. 

What is the best way to store celery?

When you bring celery home, remove it from the plastic bag. Many experts recommend tightly wrapping the vegetable in foil and storing it in the refrigerator to keep it fresh and crisp. Don't cut the celery until you are ready to use it as cutting it will speed up spoilage. If you cut celery to eat with dips, submerge the stalks in water in store in an air-tight container. 

Is celery juice just as healthy as fresh celery?

In general, eating whole fruits and vegetables is better for your body than consuming juice. Whole fruits and veggies usually contain less sugar and more fiber than drinking juice. However, if you are trying to increase your intake of certain vitamins (like vitamin K) the juice may provide a higher concentration than eating a single serving of the food.

Is celery or celery juice a negative-calorie food?

Negative calorie foods are those foods that take more energy (calories) to digest than the food provides. 

Even though celery is very low in calories, it does contain some calories. Some of these calories are in the form of fiber. Fiber is not absorbed by the body. But you also gain calories from sugar and protein.

While your body does burn calories to chew and digest celery, you are not likely to burn more calories than you consume. Additionally, juice takes less energy to digest, so you would use less energy consuming the drink. It is not likely that celery or celery juice is a negative calorie food.

Cooking and Preparation Tips

There are different celery juice recipes and variations, but most follow the same basic steps.

How to Make Celery Juice at Home—3 Steps

  1. Begin with 3-5 fresh raw celery stalks. Rinse and chop into thirds, keeping leaves intact
  2. Add the vegetable to a to a blender with a half to a full cup of water.
  3. Blend on high for 20-30 seconds.

If you prefer, you can press the celery juice through a seive to get a smoother drink. Serve over ice with a slice of lemon or lime.

If you prefer, add ingredients such as kale, cucumber, apple, cilantro, spinach, or citrus fruit for flavor.

Allergies and Interactions

According to the University of Manchester, celery allergies are possible. Celery allergy is associated with allergy to birch pollen and also allergy to mugwort pollen. According to the source, raw celery, cooked celery, and celery spice have all caused reactions although some individuals may not react to cooked celery.  Symptoms are usually localized to the mouth area and severe reactions are rare.

Medical sources advise caution when drinking celery juice and taking acetaminophen (such as Tylenol) as the drink may prolong the effects of the medication. Also patients taking sedatives, levothyroxine, lithium or medications that increase sensitivity to sunlight should talk with their healthcare provider before drinking celery juice as celery may interact with their medication.

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View Article Sources
  • AllergyInformation for Celery. Allergenic Food and Allergens. The University of Nebraska-Lincoln.Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources.
  • Vitamin K. National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements. Consumer Fact Sheet. 2013.
  • Vitamin C. National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements. Fact Sheet for Professionals.