The 9 Best Women’s Running Shoes for Plantar Fasciitis of 2023

Hoka's Bondi 8 is lightweight, with plush cushioning and firm support

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The 10 Best Women's Running Shoes for Plantar Fasciitis of 2022

Verywell Fit / Sabrina Jiang

Plantar fasciitis is a common injury among women who run. It can sideline you for weeks or even months. The pain, usually felt in the heel and bottom of your foot, can sometimes be caused or made worse by wearing the wrong type of running shoes.

Reviewed & Approved

Hoka's Bondi 8 is our top overall pick because it combines thick, foam cushioning and neutral support in a stylish sneaker. We also recommend Saucony's Ride 15, which has a contoured midsole for a more custom-like fit. Both shoes have earned the APMA Seal of Acceptance, which means the American Podiatric Medical Association has recognized that they promote good foot health.

If you’re suffering from plantar fasciitis (or you’re worried about it coming back), what you’re wearing on your feet matters. “People who are prone to plantar fasciitis should look for good support in a running shoe as well as cushioning,” podiatrist Ami Sheth, DPM, FACFAS, says. Sheth recommends looking for a shoe that is supportive and not too flexible. “It should only bend at the toes, and you should not be able to twist it,” she explains. “It should also have a good heel counter, so your heel doesn't slip.”

We researched dozens of women’s running shoes for plantar fasciitis and evaluated them based on material, price, comfort, weight, and breathability. Whether you run or walk on roads or trails, you’re sure to find a shoe on this list that meets your needs, budget, and preferences.

Best Overall

Hoka Women's Bondi 8 Running Shoe

4.9
best gym shoes

Hoka

Pros
  • Thick, plush cushioning

  • Comes in two widths

  • APMA Seal of Acceptance

Cons
  • Expensive

Hoka's Bondi 8 is our top overall pick, because it's a stylish sneaker with thick foam cushioning and a neutral support system. This shoe has also earned the APMA Seal of Acceptance, which means that a group of podiatrists at the American Podiatric Medical Association have determined that it helps promote good foot health.

A lightweight, mesh upper breathes well to keep your feet cool, while a memory foam collar helps to stabilize your ankle. In addition to the plush midsole, a rear crash pad offers extra padding underneath your heel and provides smooth transitions. We like the stylish design, which is available in a wide range of bright and neutral colors.

The Bondi 8 comes in half sizes and two widths, so finding the right fit is easy, but it's more expensive than most other sneakers on our list.

Price at time of publication: $220

Materials: Mesh upper, foam midsole, rubber outsole | Cushioning: Thick midsole, rear crash pad | Sizes: 5 to 12 | Weight: 8.9 ounces

Best Cushioned

Saucony Women's Ride 15

Saucony Women's Ride 15

Amazon

Pros
  • APMA Seal of Acceptance

  • Lightweight

  • Contoured midsole

Cons
  • May run narrow

For shoe with plenty of cushioning, we recommend Saucony's Ride 15. Another APMA Seal of Acceptance winner, the Ride 15 has a soft, foam midsole that's contoured to hug your foot. A padded sockliner offers stability and support while you run.

The mesh upper is breathable, and the rubber outsole is durable, no matter where you like to run. It's also made with recycled materials, for a shoe that's both sleek and eco-friendly. Meant for neutral runners, it's a lightweight shoe that's built for comfort. However, some wearers note that the Ride 15 may run narrow, even in the wide version.

Price at time of publication: $140

Materials: Mesh upper with recycled materials, foam midsole, rubber outsole | Cushioning: Foam midsole, cushioned sockliner | Sizes: 5 to 12 | Weight: 7.8 ounces

Best Lightweight

Hoka Arahi 6 Running Shoe

4.5
Hoka Arahi 6 Running Shoe

Zappos

Pros
  • APMA Seal of Acceptance

  • Good for overpronators

  • Extended heel pull

Cons
  • Might not have enough traction for some

The lightest sneakers on our list, we recommend Hoka's Arahi 6 if you're searching for a shoe to help you beat your personal record. Designed with the most stability Hoka offers, the Arahi 6 is sturdy underfoot and comfortably padded. It's also built to gently correct overpronation, or excessive inward rolling of the foot and ankle.

A third APMA Seal of acceptance recipient, the Arahi 6 also has a molded midsole and a cushioned tongue. We like the extended heel pull, which makes it easy to get the shoe on and off (even without a traditional tab). Extra rubber in certain places on the outsole provides better durability where you need it most.

Wearers note that the toe box is wide enough for most feet, but the outsole might not have enough traction for running outdoors in rain or snow.

Price at time of publication: $140

Materials: Mesh upper, mesh lining with recycled materials, foam midsole, rubber outsole | Cushioning: Compression-molded foam midsole | Sizes: 5 to 12 | Weight: 7.6 ounces

Best for Trail Running

Brooks Women's Cascadia 16

Brooks Women's Cascadia 16

Amazon

Pros
  • Good traction

  • Soft, lightweight cushioning

  • Wide toe box

Cons
  • Not designed for rugged trails

  • Not water-resistant or waterproof

Brooks' Cascadia 16 is our top pick for a shoe that's great for plantar fasciitis and trail running. With a durable rock plate and increased stability, these sneakers are ideal for taking on uneven, gravelly routes.

The rubber outsole has deep lugs that provide great traction. We like the foam midsole, which feels soft underfoot. Wearers also note that the toe box is wide, for a roomy, comfortable fit.

While the Cascadia is meant for trail running, it's not designed for ultra-rugged terrain. It's also not water-resistant or waterproof, so you may want to be careful with yours in the rain or snow.

Price at time of publication: $130

Materials: Foam midsole, rubber outsole | Cushioning: Foam midsole | Sizes: 5 to 12 | Weight: 9.5 ounces

Best for Overpronation

Asics Women's Gel-Kayano 28

4.8
Asics Women's Gel-Kayano 28

Asics

Pros
  • Durable outsole

  • Two kinds of cushioning

  • Breathable mesh upper

Cons
  • Expensive

If you're an overpronator with plantar fasciitis, we recommend the Gel-Kayano 28 from Asics, because they're specifically designed to help correct your stride. Available in three widths in a wide range of sizes, these sneakers have more rearfoot support and a lower heel counter for added stability.

We love the midsole, which uses both foam and gel to absorb shock and cushion your stride. A mesh upper encourages airflow, while a lightweight sock liner feels comfortable, even on long runs.

The durable rubber outsole performs whether you're running indoors or out. However, it's also one of the more expensive shoes on our list.

Price at time of publication: $160

Materials: Mesh upper, foam and gel midsole, rubber outsole | Cushioning: Foam and gel | Sizes: 5 to 13 | Weight: 9.1 ounces

Best for Underpronation

Asics Gel-Nimbus 24

Asics Gel-Nimbus 24

Amazon

Pros
  • Wide range of colors and sizes

  • Soft, knit tongue

  • Reflective details

Cons
  • Expensive

  • May run small

Underpronators with plantar fasciitis need a running shoe with good stability and structured support, like Asics' Gel-Nimbus 24. These sneakers have a soft, foam midsole and a durable rubber outsole to keep you feeling light on your feet.

Available in a wide range of colors and sizes, the Gel-Nimbus 24 was made to fit every style. There's also a knit tongue for additional support across the top of your feet. We like that they have reflective details for running in low-light conditions. These do come in at a higher price point, however, and it's also worth noting that some wearers have found that the shoes run small.

Price at time of publication: $160

Materials: Mesh upper with recycled materials, foam midsole, rubber outsole | Cushioning: Foam midsole | Sizes: 5 to 13 | Weight: 8.7 ounces

Best for High Arches

New Balance Fresh Foam X 860v12 Running Shoes

New Balance Fresh Foam X 860 v12 Running Shoes

Amazon

Pros
  • Come in four widths

  • Reflective details

Cons
  • Laces may be too short for some

Runners with high arches will appreciate the thoughtful design of New Balance's Fresh Foam X 860v12 shoes. A layered foam midsole is sculpted, so your arches feel comfortable and supported while you run. The rubber outsole also offers good traction for running outdoors. We like the subtle reflective details.

A padded collar and tongue helps support your ankles, while the interior mesh lining feels breathable. We also like that the 860v12s are available in four widths in sizes from 5 to 12, so you can find the right fit.

Some wearers have found that the laces are too short, causing them to come untied.

Price at time of publication: $135

Materials: Synthetic mesh upper, foam midsole, rubber outsole | Cushioning: Layered foam midsole | Sizes: 5 to 12 | Weight: 9.6 ounces

Best for Flat Feet

Brooks Ghost 14

4.7
Brooks Ghost 14

Brooks

Pros
  • Available in three widths

  • Carbon neutral

  • APMA Seal of Acceptance

Cons
  • Laces may be too short for some

If you have flat feet and plantar fasciitis, we recommend Brooks' Ghost 14. Another APMA Seal of Acceptance winner, the Ghost 14 has plush, foam cushioning for comfortable runs. We like the smooth transitions and neutral support, which set this shoe apart from others on our list.

Made with recycled materials, including plastic bottles, this shoe is carbon neutral. It also contains a crash pad for extra padding underfoot.

We love the flexible upper, which provides a close fit. However, some wearers note that the laces are too short, making the fit difficult to adjust.

Price at time of publication: $140

Materials: Recycled upper, foam midsole, rubber outsole | Cushioning: Foam midsole | Sizes: 5 to 13 | Weight: 9.0 ounces

Best for Heel Pain

Mizuno Women's Wave Rider 25 Running Shoe

Mizuno Women's Wave Rider 25

Mizuno

Pros
  • Lightweight

  • Good shock absorption

Cons
  • May run small

With plenty of cushioning, Mizuno's Wave Rider 25 is our top pick for runners who are looking to combat heel pain. A plate in the shoe is designed to increase stability and dissipate shock while you run. The midsole is also durable and padded enough to protect your heel.

A breathable mesh upper keeps your feet cool, while a carbon rubber outsole can withstand many runs to come. At 8.3 ounces, they're also more lightweight than many other sneakers we researched, but some wearers report that they run a half size small.

Overall, we like the value this shoe provides, at a cost that's a little less than others on our list.

Price at time of publication: $140

Materials: Mesh upper, foam midsole, rubber outsole | Cushioning: Foam midsole | Sizes: 6 to 12 | Weight: 8.3 ounces

How We Selected the Best Women's Running Shoes for Plantar Fasciitis

To choose the best women's running shoes for plantar fasciitis, we first spoke with Dr. Ami Sheth, DPM, FACFAS, a podiatrist, to get her expert opinion on which features every pair should have. Then, we researched dozens of sneakers from the most popular and trusted brands. We considered materials, cushioning, arch support, size range, price, design, and more. The shoes on our list were determined to have the best combination of these factors.

What to Look for in Women's Running Shoes for Plantar Fasciitis

Comfort

Cushioning and support are two important factors that contribute to comfort. Ideally, you want something that feels comfortable right out of the box, eliminating any need for a break-in period. When your foot strikes the ground, you should have enough padding to eliminate shock, but you also want something that’s flexible and nimble. Weight can also contribute to comfort. 

“For some people, it’s a big deal and it affects their running,” says Dr. Ami Sheth, DPM, FACFAS. She says that having a lightweight shoe may be important, but the more important factor is stability and durability.

Support

People with plantar fasciitis feel strain when they bear weight on their feet, so a shoe with proper support is essential to avoid injury or pain.

“Sometimes, people really focus on the arch support and their foot may not need that much. So, for example, they feel ‘arch support,’ but they are actually walking on the outsides of their feet,” says Sheth. Since support is difficult to define, she recommends finding a shoe that only flexes in the toe area and one that can’t twist. The heel counter should also hold your heel firm so that it doesn’t move around when you’re walking or running. 

Fit

“It’s good to have a professional fit you,” notes Sheth. “Often, sizes can vary as can the width of the shoe, so not every size 7.5 will fit the same in each brand.” She says that your feet should have a little more than half an inch of space between your longest toe and the edge of the interior of the shoe, allowing you to wiggle your toes in the toe box. If you have wide or narrow feet, make sure to focus on the width of the shoe before committing. (Or look for one that comes in multiple widths so you can try a few sizes, like New Balance's Fresh Foam X 860v12.)

Style

Even if a shoe is designed for support and performance, it can accommodate your style as well. Fortunately, there are a wide variety of running shoes in multiple colors and styles that still provide good durability and support, like our top overall pick, Hoka's Bondi 8. Fit and comfort should still be priorities, but if you’re looking for great-looking shoes to motivate you to get moving, a shoe should also be able to hit the marks with style.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Are running shoes good to wear if you have plantar fasciitis?

    Yes, wearing the right running shoes with proper support can help to ease the symptoms of plantar fasciitis or prevent it from coming back. The experts at a specialty running store can do a gait and foot analysis and give you recommendations on the best running shoes for plantar fasciitis.

    “Look for good support in a running shoe as well as cushioning,” Dr. Sheth says. “Many shoes have a thinner sole now, to make them lighter, but that doesn't help with shock absorption. A shoe with good cushioning will help with impact.”

  • Can running make plantar fasciitis worse?

    Research on continued activity with plantar fasciitis suggests that you should keep your pain levels to a minimum while running. However, it's worth noting that pain may exacerbate the condition, especially if you’re running in worn-out or the wrong type of shoes for your foot type. Talk to your podiatrist or physical therapist about steps to alleviate your symptoms.

Why Trust Verywell Fit

As a running coach, marathon runner, and fitness writer, Christine Luff has spent years researching and recommending running and walking shoes. To walk in comfort and reduce injury risk, she suggests getting properly fitted for walking shoes and replacing them regularly.

Additional reporting by Sarah Felbin

With over two decades of dance experience, Sarah Felbin loves diving into the latest wellness research. As a health and fitness writer, she's passionate about finding products that offer great value and make life easier.

4 Sources
Verywell Fit uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.
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  3. Petraglia F, Ramazzina I, Costantino C. Plantar fasciitis in athletes: diagnostic and treatment strategies. A systematic reviewMuscles Ligaments Tendons J. 2017;7(1):107-118. doi:10.11138/mltj/2017.7.1.107

  4. Lim AT, How CH, Tan B. Management of plantar fasciitis in the outpatient settingSingapore Med J. 2016;57(4):168-171. doi:10.11622/smedj.2016069