The 9 Best Tennis Shoes for Women to Buy in 2019

Move with confidence on the court

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Tennis is one of the best games you can play to improve your health. On top of the cardio benefits, each game strengthens your legs, arms, and core, while the fast-paced strategy keeps your mind sharp as well.

Compared to team sports, tennis has a smaller barrier to entry, but you may need some pointers on what kind of shoes to buy. Running shoes and generic athletic sneakers aren’t designed to supply the specific kind of arch and ankle support for all of the lateral movement that tennis requires.

If you’re in the market for a new set of tennis sneakers, here’s a look at the top women’s tennis shoes to buy.

First Look

Best Overall: ASICS Gel Solution Speed FF L.E. at Amazon

"This state-of-the-art tennis shoe is made from lightweight, breathable materials."

Best Budget: Nike Court Lite at Amazon

"This shoe’s Phylon midsole provides lightweight underfoot cushioning, and a durable leather and mesh upper means these shoes are built to last."

Best for Flat Feet: Asics Gel-Game 6 at Amazon

"The Trusstic System reduces weight on your sole without sacrificing the structural integrity of the shoe."

Best for Plantar Fasciitis: K-Swiss Grancourt II at Amazon

"The impact-absorbing EVA midsole makes them easy to stand in for hours."

Best for Wide Feet: New Balance WC806 at Amazon

"The ROLLBAR post running down the length of the shoe adds motion control, while ABZORB midfoot cushioning provides exceptional shock absorption."

Best for Narrow Feet: New Balance WC1006 at Amazon

"This shoe’s REVlite midsole adds bounce and energy to your step for a quicker tennis game."

Best for Hard Courts: Wilson Kaos 2.0 at Zappos

"Specialized forefoot technology locks in the your foot for added stability on hard courts."

Best for Grass Courts: Babolat Propulse Blast at Amazon

"Strategically placed Power Straps adapt to lateral footwork, giving you your best grass-court game yet."

Best for Clay Courts: Nike Air Zoom Pegasus at Zappos

"This neutral shoe has a light, flexible response without compromising on cushioning and stability."

Our Top Picks

Best Overall: ASICS Gel Solution Speed FF L.E.

ASICS Gel Solution Speed FF L.E.

Courtesy of Amazon

Women searching for the best tennis shoe on the market need look no further than the Asics Gel Solution Speed FF. This state-of-the-art tennis shoe is made from lightweight, breathable materials. It incorporates some of the best design qualities from Asics Gel-Solution Speed 3 and their Gel-Court FF, including FlyteFoam midsole technology and Twisstruss support system for the ultimate in support, speed, and cushioning.

Best Budget: Nike Court Lite

If you’re just starting out with your tennis game, you’ve got a few things to buy—a good racquet, balls, and tennis skirts can add up quickly. Nike’s budget-friendly Court Lite fits the shoe bill without breaking the bank. This shoe’s Phylon midsole provides lightweight underfoot cushioning, and a durable leather and mesh upper means these shoes are built to last.

Best for Flat Feet: Asics Gel-Game 6

Women tennis players with low arches or flat feet need to find the right balance of cushioning and support when looking into tennis shoes. Without an impact-absorbing gel cushion, you’re going to be putting a lot of stress on the inner part of your foot, which could result in some serious aches and pains later. Japanese footwear designer Asics crafted the Gel-Game 6 for women who need that kind of impact protection. The Trusstic System reduces weight on your sole without sacrificing the structural integrity of the shoe.

Best for Plantar Fasciitis: K-Swiss Grancourt II

Plantar fasciitis can cut your tennis workouts short. It occurs when the tight band of tissue that forms the arch of your foot becomes inflamed, leading to heel pain. However, the right shoes can reduce those pains and get you back in the game.

The most important things in a tennis shoe for women struggling with plantar fasciitis are cushioning and arch support. K-Swiss has a reputation for making shoes with a lot of cushioning, and the Grancourt II tennis shoe is no exception. The impact-absorbing EVA midsole makes them easy to stand in for hours.

Best for Wide Feet: New Balance WC806

New Balance WC806

Courtesy of Amazon

Women with wide feet might be frustrated when it comes to finding tennis shoes that fit well. Luckily, the WC806 from New Balance offers widths up to EE in women’s sizes.

This shoe is designed for avid women tennis players looking for superior support for their wide feet. The ROLLBAR post running down the length of the shoe adds motion control, while ABZORB midfoot cushioning provides exceptional shock absorption.

Best for Narrow Feet: New Balance WC1006

New Balance WC1006

Courtesy of Amazon

If you’re a woman with narrow feet, it can be hard to find shoes that fit well in general, not just when looking specifically for tennis shoes. However, having extra room inside tennis shoes can be dangerous—if your foot slides inside the shoe at the wrong time, you could be in for a painful ankle or tendon injury. New Balance’s WC1006 model is available in narrow sizes and still works well as a tennis shoe.

This shoe’s REVlite midsole adds bounce and energy to your step for a quicker tennis game. The rubber sole provides superior grip on any court, while a removable foam insole leaves room for custom orthotics if necessary.

Best for Hard Courts: Wilson Kaos 2.0

Wilson Kaos 2.0

Courtesy of Zappos

Whether you’re a woman who is new to the sport or an experienced tennis player, you’ve probably noticed that hard courts—cement slab or asphalt—are the most common surface you’re going to find for pick-up games outside of your local tennis club. On the one hand, buying tennis shoes for hard courts is a little easier since most companies create their shoes for hard court play. However, you’re going to feel the difference in your joints if you’re not used to it—getting some good padding and support in your shoe is vital.

The Wilson Kaos 2.0 delivers on cushioning and rebound while also feeling very lightweight thanks to the breathable, soft lining. Specialized forefoot technology locks in your foot for added stability on hard courts and the Pro Torque Chassis Light uses arch technology built for speed for a more dynamic game.

Best for Grass Courts: Babolat Propulse Blast

If you’re playing on grass courts, you’re not going to need as much cushioning in the soles and ankles since the ground itself will be softer. However, that relief will be offset by a loss in traction, since grass is a bit slicker than clay or concrete. The ball will also fly a bit lower due to the reduced bounce you’ll get on a softer court, meaning you’ll need some extra grip to propel you back and forth along the service line.

Babolat’s Propulse Blast has a little Michelin Man logo on the heel—the sole is made by the tire experts at Michelin, guaranteeing a firmer grip on grass courts. Strategically placed Power Straps adapt to lateral footwork, giving you your best grass-court game yet.

Best for Clay Courts: Nike Air Zoom Pegasus

Nike Air Zoom Pegasus

Courtesy of Zappos

Clay courts provide a compromise between the speed of grass courts and the bounce of hard courts, which benefits players of all skill levels in some way. If you’re a woman playing on a clay court, you’ll notice the difference from a hard court almost immediately—your knees will probably thank you. You’ll want a balanced shoe to go with this balanced court, and the Nike Air Zoom Pegasus is up to the challenge.

This neutral shoe has a light, flexible response without compromising on cushioning and stability. The beveled heel and rubber outsole strip help your foot land in a solid position, while lockdown fit mesh is engineered for a superior stretch without foregoing support.

Our Process

Our writers spent 8 hours researching the most popular women's tennis shoes on the market. Before making their final recommendations, they considered 18 different shoes overall, screened options from 15 different brands and manufacturers and read over 41 user reviews (both positive and negative). All of this research adds up to recommendations you can trust.

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