15 Best Ski Jackets of 2022 For All Experience Levels

Our top pick, Burton’s Women’s Prowess Jacket, is breathable and quick-drying

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Best Ski Jackets of 2022

Burton

If your winter coat just isn’t cutting it on the slopes, it might be time to invest in a ski jacket. “Puffer jackets will keep you warm due to the filling within them, but can often feel bulky, making maneuvers difficult. Puffers also provide less protection from the elements and may let snow or water in, which is an important factor when you hit the slopes. If you get wet, it won't be long before you start feeling the cold,“ Kev Edwards, ski instructor and Head of Snow Sports at Chill Factore in Manchester, England, says.

Reviewed & Approved

Made from recycled materials that are waterproof and quick-drying, Burton’s Women’s Prowess Jacket is our best women’s overall pick. Outdoor Research’s Snowcrew Jacket is our best men’s overall pick because it has an impressive range of features, including a two-way zipper, interior and exterior pockets, and an adjustable fit.

When looking for a new ski jacket, consider which materials it’s made from, how it fits, and which type of jacket is right for you. If you spend long days in the cold, an insulated jacket will keep you warmer than a lightweight shell jacket will. But in climates where the weather changes quickly, you might prefer a 3-in-1 jacket that allows you to remove the thermal liner when needed.

To find the best ski jackets, we researched over 40 options and assessed their fit, design, price, and more. We also consulted two skiing experts to get their opinion on which features are most important to have in a well-made ski jacket.

Based on our research, here are the best ski jackets on the market.

Best Women’s Overall: Burton Prowess Jacket

4.9
Burton Prowess Jacket

Burton

Pros
  • Zippered vents for added breathability

  • Made with recycled materials

  • Lifetime warranty

Cons
  • Designed for medium-intensity activities

Burton’s Prowess Jacket is our top women’s overall pick because it’s waterproof, quick-drying, and breathable. Made with recycled materials, it features zippered vents to keep you cool on the slopes, plus interior and exterior pockets to store your season pass and other valuables. We also like that it’s covered by a lifetime warranty. 

However, this hooded jacket is built for medium-intensity activities—so if you’re spending long days on the mountain, it may not wick away enough sweat. Choose from a wide range of colors, patterns, and sizes for the perfect look. 

Price at time of publication: $146

Type: Insulated | Insulation: Synthetic | Waterproof: Yes | Sizes: XXS to 2XL | Care: Machine wash

Best Men’s Overall: Outdoor Research Men's Snowcrew Jacket

4.8
Outdoor Research Men's Snowcrew Jacket

Amazon

Pros
  • Lightweight

  • Two-way front zipper

  • Built-in thumb holes

Cons
  • Zippers may not be as durable

Outdoor Research’s Snowcrew Jacket is our best men’s overall pick because it’s lightweight and has a wide range of features. You can get a custom-like fit with the help of an adjustable hood, hem, and cuffs. It also has enough exterior and interior pockets to hold your ski pass, your phone, your gloves, and more. 

Wrist gaiters with built-in thumb holes keep snow and ice out of your sleeves. And we like the two-way front zipper, which makes it easy to vent the jacket if you start to feel a little warm. However, the zipper may not be as durable over time.

Price at time of publication: $180

Type: Insulated | Insulation: Synthetic | Waterproof: Yes | Sizes: S to 3XL | Care: Machine wash cold

Best Budget: MOERDENG Women's Waterproof Ski Jacket Warm Winter Snow Coat Mountain Windbreaker Hooded Raincoat Jacket

Waterproof Ski Jacket

Amazon

Pros
  • Adjustable cuffs

  • Soft, furry lining

  • Stain-resistant

Cons
  • No vents

  • Hand wash only

If you’re searching for a jacket while on a budget, we recommend Moerdeng’s Waterproof Ski Jacket. It has a soft, furry lining that retains heat well and a coating that repels both water and stains. Plus, it has three pockets—enough to keep your hands warm and a few necessities close by, but not so many that you’ll forget where your keys are. 

Adjustable cuffs keep snow, ice, and water out, while a detachable hood will come in handy when the weather shifts. But this jacket may be too warm for some since it doesn’t have any vents to let out excess heat. The brand also recommends hand washing only. 

Choose from 14 bright colors and patterns in five sizes. 

Price at time of publication: $90

Type: Insulated | Insulation: Synthetic | Waterproof: Yes | Sizes: S to 2XL | Care: Hand wash

Best Splurge: Norrona Lofoten Gore-Tex Pro Jacket

NorronaLofoten GORE-TEX Pro Jacket

Backcountry

Pros
  • Reflective elements

  • Two-way front zipper

  • Removable powder skirt

Cons
  • May not have enough insulation for some

We recommend Norrona’s Gore-Tex Pro Jacket as the best splurge. Made with durable, recycled fibers, we like that it has upgraded features that set it apart from other options. 

You can adjust the asymmetric cuffs using Velcro or change where the hem and waist sit with just one hand. There’s also a removable powder skirt, plus zippered vents underneath each arm. A two-way front zipper offers ease of movement and even more breathability.

But because it’s a shell jacket, it’s not as insulated as others on our list, so you may need to wear thicker layers underneath on colder days. 

Price at time of publication: $799

Type: Shell | Insulation: None | Waterproof: Yes | Sizes: S to XL | Care: Machine wash

Best 3-in-1: Columbia Whirlibird IV Interchange 3-in-1 Jacket

Columbia Whirlibird IV Interchange 3-in-1 Jacket

REI

Pros
  • Comes in three fits and five sizes

  • Shell and liner can be worn separately

Cons
  • Zipper may not be as durable

For a 3-in-1 ski jacket, we recommend Columbia’s Whirlibird IV Interchange Jacket. You can wear the outer shell and the inner thermal liner separately or together, depending on the conditions outside. And we like that it’s offered in three fits (standard, big, and tall) and five sizes. 

There are also plenty of pockets for holding all of your gear, including dedicated space for your ski pass, goggles, and valuables. Vents under each arm prevent overheating, and both the hood and powder skirt are adjustable. However, the zipper may not last as long as the zippers on other jackets on our list. 

Price at time of publication: $222

Type: 3-in-1 | Insulation: Synthetic | Waterproof: Yes | Sizes: S to 2XL | Care: Machine wash

Best Shell: Helly Hansen Women’s Odin 9 Worlds 2.0 Jacket

Helly Hansen Women’s Odin 9 Worlds 2.0 Jacket

Amazon

Pros
  • Built-in reflector can be detected by rescuers

  • Lightweight

  • Windproof

Cons
  • May not have enough insulation for some

  • Expensive

Looking for the best shell ski jacket? We suggest Helly Hansen’s Odin 9 Worlds 2.0 Jacket. Because it’s a shell jacket, it’s lightweight compared to other jackets on this list. It’s also completely windproof, and we love that it has a built-in reflector that can be detected by rescue crews. 

Note that this jacket has a higher price point. Also, since it is so lightweight, it likely won’t have enough insulation for every skier—you may need to wear multiple layers underneath. But it is machine washable, and it comes in nine bright colors. 

Price at time of publication: $450

Type: Shell | Insulation: None | Waterproof: Yes | Sizes: XS to XL | Care: Machine wash

Best Resort Jacket: REI Co-Op Men’s Powderbound Jacket

REI Co-Op Men’s Powderbound Jacket

REI

Pros
  • High collar with fuzzy lining

  • Sleeves have less insulation for movement

  • Removable powder skirt

Cons
  • Sleeves may be too long for some

We recommend REI Co-Op’s Men’s Powderbound Jacket if you’re searching for the best resort ski jacket. There are plenty of pockets for your ski pass and valuables, including a key clip and a media port. It also has a high collar with a fuzzy lining to help block out wind, snow, and rain. 

We like that the price point is lower than other jackets on our list and that the sleeves have slightly less insulation (making it easier to move your arms). The powder skirt is removable, too, so you won’t have to buy a second jacket to ski on nice days. However, the sleeves may be too long for some wearers. 

Price at time of publication: $199

Type: Insulated | Insulation: Synthetic | Waterproof: Yes | Sizes: S to 3XL | Care: Not listed

Best Backcountry Jacket: Flylow Gear Lucy Jacket

Flylow Gear Lucy Jacket

Flylow Gear

Pros
  • Stylish design

  • Large zippered vents

  • Made with recycled materials

Cons
  • Expensive

Flylow Gear’s Lucy Jacket is our top pick for the best backcountry ski jacket. We love the unique, striped design which sets it apart. It’s also made with recycled polyester. The Lucy is lightweight and breathable for the uphill climb but resilient and waterproof for the way down.

And its vents measure an impressive 12 inches long. Note that this backcountry ski jacket is only a shell, so it won’t be as insulated as others on our list. It also comes in at a higher price point.  

Price at time of publication: $400

Type: Shell | Insulation: None | Waterproof: Yes | Sizes: XS to XL | Care: Not listed

Best Cross-Country Jacket: Craft Men’s Glide Hood Jacket

Craft Men’s Glide Hood Jacket

REI

Pros
  • Comes in a wide range of colors

  • Breathable

Cons
  • Only two pockets

For cross-country skiing, we recommend Craft’s Glide Hood Jacket. We like that it’s more affordable than some of the other options on our list and has an adjustable hood to protect you from the elements. Breathable jersey fabric offers extra ventilation, so you’ll be comfortable for miles. 

Because it’s just a shell, you may need to wear additional layers underneath on colder days. It also only has two pockets—compared to some on our list, like Helly Hansen Men’s Alpha 3.0 Ski Jacket, that have as many as eight. This jacket is also machine washable and comes in a wide range of sizes.

Price at time of publication: $130

Type: Shell | Insulation: None | Waterproof: Yes | Sizes: S to 2XL | Care: Machine wash

Best Size Range: Helly Hansen Men’s Alpha 3.0 Ski Jacket

Helly Hansen Men's Alpha 3.0 Ski Jacket

Amazon

Pros
  • Sizes ranging from 3XS to 5XL

  • Eight pockets

  • Zippered vents for added breathability

Cons
  • Hand wash only

Helly Hansen’s Alpha 3.0 is our pick for the jacket with the best size range. It comes in 11 different sizes and has plenty of features that create a customized fit. You can adjust the cuffs, the zippered vents, and the hood—or remove it if you prefer. 

This jacket also features eight pockets, including a phone pocket and a ski pass pocket, and a stretch powder skirt. We like that the Alpha 3.0 is built for intense activity in wet weather and other harsh conditions, meaning it’s ideal for almost any winter sport. However, you’ll have to hand wash it.

Price at time of publication: $475

Type: Insulated | Insulation: Synthetic | Waterproof: Yes | Sizes: 3XS to 5XL | Care: Hand wash

Best Waterproof: Outdoor Research Women’s Kulshan Storm Jacket

Outdoor Research Women’s Kulshan Storm Jacket

Outdoor Research

Pros
  • Two-way front zipper

  • Front Velcro

  • Six pockets

Cons
  • Expensive

  • Fit may be off for some wearers

Outdoor Research’s Kulshan Storm Jacket is our top choice for a waterproof ski jacket. It’s breathable, with a two-way front zipper and zippered vents underneath each arm. And it has six pockets—four exterior pockets with zippers and two interior hidden pockets. 

We like that the Kulshan Storm also has Velcro down the front, so you have options when it comes to fastening the jacket. An adjustable hood and cuffs help keep you warm and protected. But it’s more expensive than others on our list, and the fit may be too boxy or tight in the upper body for some wearers. 

Price at time of publication: $450

Type: Shell | Insulation: None | Waterproof: Yes | Sizes: XS to XL | Care: Machine wash cold

Most Insulated: Spyder Men’s Signal Insulated Anorak

Spyder Men’s Signal Insulated Anorak

Spyder

Pros
  • Side body zips for easy on and off

  • Adjustable hood and hem

  • Large exterior pockets

Cons
  • No interior pockets

  • Expensive

On cold days, you’ll need a well-insulated ski jacket like Spyder’s Signal Anorak. We recommend this jacket because it has large zippers on either side, so you can easily slide it on and off, even after a long day of snow sports. 

We like that the hood and hem are adjustable for a close fit. And it has four pockets: One for a card, one Velcro pocket, and two zippered kangaroo pockets. However, it’s worth noting that there are no interior pockets like some of our other picks have, including Burton’s Women’s Prowess Jacket

Price at time of publication: $494

Type: Insulated | Insulation: Synthetic | Waterproof: Yes | Sizes: S to 2XL | Care: Not listed

Best Gore-Tex: Patagonia Men’s Triolet Jacket

Patagonia Men’s Triolet Jacket

Patagonia

Pros
  • Built-in reflector can be detected by rescuers

  • Made with recycled materials

  • Five pockets

Cons
  • Expensive

Patagonia’s Men’s Triolet Jacket is our recommendation for the best Gore-Tex ski jacket. Gore-Tex is a thin layer of Teflon that’s sandwiched between nylon and polyurethane fabric. It’s waterproof but also completely breathable—meaning it lets moisture out but not in. Other jackets on our list are also made with Gore-Tex elements, including Outdoor Research’s Kulshan Storm Jacket and Norrona’s Gore-Tex Pro Jacket. 

We like that it has a built-in reflector that rescue crews can detect on the slopes—an added safety feature. It’s also made with recycled materials, and it has five pockets to warm your hands and keep essentials close. But it’s expensive compared to other options. 

Price at time of publication: $399

Type: Shell | Insulation: None | Waterproof: Yes | Sizes: S to 2XL | Care: Not listed

Best Down Insulated: The North Face Women’s Heavenly Down Jacket

The North Face Women’s Heavenly Down Jacket

The North Face

Pros
  • Sleek, stylish design

  • Five zippered pockets

Cons
  • Limited size range

The North Face’s Heavenly Down Jacket is our recommendation for the best down-insulated ski jacket. Down insulation will keep you extra warm, even on a windy mountain. And with five zippered pockets, there’s enough room to keep everything close by. 

We love the stylish design, which is slimmer and more modern than others on our list. It also has zippered vents under each arm and elastic cuffs to keep the elements out. However, this jacket is only offered in a few sizes. 

Price at time of publication: $280

Type: Insulated | Insulation: Down | Waterproof: Yes | Sizes: XS to XL | Care: Not listed

Best for Kids: Volcom Vernon Insulated Jacket

Volcom Vernon Insulated Jacket

Buckmans

Pros
  • Removable hood

  • Chin guard

  • Sleeve extender

Cons
  • No zippered vents

  • No thumbholes

For the best kids' ski jacket, we recommend Volcom’s Vernon Insulated Jacket. We like the kid-friendly features, including a removable hood, a ski pass pocket with a leash, and a chin guard. Lost passes and snow down shirts won’t be a problem this winter. 

The Vernon also has sleeve extenders, so it will fit for many seasons to come. But it doesn’t have any zippered vents, which can lead to overheating. It also doesn’t have thumbholes, so a good pair of gloves is a must. 

Price at time of publication: $155

Type: Insulated | Insulation: Synthetic | Waterproof: Yes | Sizes: S to XL | Care: Not listed

How We Selected the Best Ski Jackets

To choose the best ski jackets, we first spoke with Kev Edwards, ski instructor and Head of Snow Sports at Chill Factore in Manchester, England, and Ashleigh McClary, an avid skier and product expert at Backcountry. They shared their expert opinions on which features every ski jacket needs to have. 

Then, we researched over 40 jackets from the most trusted and popular brands. We considered the type of ski jacket, the quality, and the price. We also examined the fit, material, additional features, and design.

What to Look For in a Ski Jacket

Material

“A quality jacket will usually be at least two layers—three for extra durability, breathability, and waterproofing—will have a waterproof membrane, waterproof zippers or zipper flap, and sometimes will even have a zip-in liner feature,” McClary says. Common materials used in the outer layers of ski jackets include nylon, polyester, and Gore-Tex. The insulation may be either down (like in North Face’s Heavenly Down Jacket) or synthetic materials. And the inner lining is often made from a soft or fuzzy synthetic fabric.

This durable, high-tech construction is what sets ski jackets apart from other coats. “A ski jacket is specifically designed to cope with all elements, like powder to wet snow and high winds to high exertion levels. They also have a robust and flexible material, meaning that they don’t tear as easily, keeping you safer while you ski and more protected from your ski edges,” Edwards explains.


Fit

Your ski jacket shouldn’t be too tight, especially when you’re wearing additional layers underneath. You should be able to move around freely on the slopes. On the other hand, a ski jacket that’s too loose may not insulate you as much as it should, letting in snow and cold air. Also, consider length—some jackets have long hems, others have short hems, and some are adjustable. 


Additional Features

Check to see if the jacket you’re buying comes with any additional features. “Vents are useful for allowing hot air to move out and bring cool air in. The more vents and pockets, the greater the circulation. Pockets are always useful for easy access to your goggles, lift pass, headphones, or anything else you feel you may need. Elastication around the cuffs and waist are also useful to stop snow from getting into your jacket,” Edwards says.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Can ski jackets be worn every day?

    Technically, yes. While you can wear your ski jacket every day, it may be bulkier and much warmer than your winter coat. This means you may overheat unless you live in a very cold climate. Wearing your ski jacket every day can also affect how long it lasts. Consider keeping your ski jacket separate from your everyday winter coat. 

  • How much should a quality ski jacket cost?

    Ski jackets can cost between $70-$1000, with average prices ranging from $250-$450. “Features, durability, and waterproofing separate a cheap jacket from a quality one,” Edwards says. More expensive ski jackets often have additional features, like better insulation or more pockets. Less expensive jackets might be less durable and may have flimsier details (like zippers and snaps). 

    The cheapest jacket on our list, Moerdeng Women’s Waterproof Ski Jacket, is often available for $90. And our best overall picks, Burton’s Prowess Jacket and Outdoor Research’s Snowcrew Jacket were $146 and $180 when we published this list. 

  • How warm should my ski jacket be?

    How warm a ski jacket is depends on what kind of insulation it’s made with. “Typically there are two types of insulation in ski jackets: down and synthetic,” McClary says. “Synthetic insulation keeps you warm when wet and is great in ski jackets. Down is warmer, lighter, and more compressible, but doesn’t keep you warm when wet.”

    She adds that down jackets come in different fills, ranging from 550 fill to 850 fill. The number indicates how much down is in the jacket. Jackets with a higher fill power rating will have a smaller amount of lower quality down, which makes them lighter and not as warm. “The higher number the fill power rating is, the more air that down can trap–meaning the warmer the jacket will be,” she says.

  • What should I wear underneath my ski jacket?

    “You need three layers when skiing. The first should be a tight, thin, and breathable base layer, like a thermal. The second is a thicker layer, like fleece, for colder temperatures to keep you nice and warm. The third layer is your ski jacket to keep you defended from the elements,“ Edwards says.

    Some ski jackets, like Helly Hansen’s Alpha 3.0 Ski Jacket, have the second and third layers combined, so you’ll only need to wear a base layer underneath. Others only have the shell, so you’ll need two layers underneath. The weather is also important to consider—on warmer days, you may need fewer layers.

  • Should a ski jacket be waterproof or water-resistant?

    If you want to stay dry and warm, your ski jacket should be waterproof, not water-resistant. “If it isn’t snowing or sleeting, your jacket doesn’t have to be waterproof. But if you fall in the snow, you will still likely get wet if the jacket is only water-resistant,” McClary says.

  • How often should I wash my ski jacket?

    How often you wash your ski jacket depends on how often you wear it. Washing it regularly shouldn’t cause any damage as long as you follow the manufacturer’s instructions. Once a month is a good guideline if you wear it often. But if you only wear it a few times each season, you may only want to wash it once when the season ends.

Why Trust Verywell Fit

As a qualified personal trainer and health and fitness writer, Ravi Davda understands how important quality product recommendations can be. He recommends products that are reliable, comfortable, and genuinely well-reviewed by those who’ve tried them.

1 Source
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  1. Bydełek A, Berdychowski M, Talaśka K. Modeling of Material Characteristics of Conventional Synthetic FabricsAutex Research Journal. 2022.