12 Best Resistance Bands of 2022, Tested and Reviewed

RenoJ's Resistance Bands Set has grippy, non-slip strips for leg workouts

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resistance bands test

Verywell Fit / Nick Kova

Whether you prefer upper body conditioning, core exercises, or leg days at the gym, using resistance bands is a great way to add a challenging component to your workout and help improve your strength, stability, and mobility.

Tested & Approved

Made from a grippy, non-slip material, RenoJ's Resistance Bands Set is perfect for leg and glute workouts. For a budget-friendly and versatile buy, we recommend the Insonder's Resistance Bands Set.

There are multiple types of resistance bands—including loop bands, tube bands, power/assist bands, and resistance straps. When used in sequence with bodyweight movements, resistance bands are designed to mimic the use of machines, free weights, and bulky gym equipment. “My favorite type of resistance band is a loop band for exercises like squats, glute bridges, and deadlifts,” says Gabby Drucker, personal trainer, and owner of Drucker Fitness in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

We purchased 20 resistance bands and tested them in The Verywell Testing Lab. Each band (or set of bands) was rated on a scale from one to five based on quality, accuracy of unit measurements, versatility, feel and grip, portability and storage, and overall value.

Below, you'll find the best resistance bands on the market.

Best Overall Loop Bands: RenoJ Resistance Bands Set

4.8
RenoJ Resistance Bands Set

Courtesy of Amazon

Our Ratings
  • Quality
    5/5
  • Resistance Accuracy
    4.5/5
  • Versatility
    4/5
  • Feel & Grip
    5/5
  • Portability
    5/5
Pros
  • Grippy non-slip strip

  • Instructions included

  • Affordable

Cons
  • Max tension not as intense as other bands

  • Better for beginners

What do buyers say? 94% of 33,000+ Amazon reviewers rated this product 4 stars or above.

After completing a series of squats, clamshells, lateral walks, and light arm exercises, we gave the Renoj Exercise Workout Bands the top spot in our loop band category thanks to the non-slip grip and latex-polyester knit composition, which made for a comfortable fit.

The woven style and double-stitched seam appeared durable and helpful for avoiding snapping, tearing, or unraveling of the band. The set comes with three bands in light, medium, and heavy resistance levels. The bands appeared durable, although our tester noted that she would have preferred if they were smaller in diameter to add some more resistance during exercises.

Testing Notes: “The portability and durability of these bands are what sets them apart. The grip and feel are also really nice, especially compared to thinner rubber bands that tend to roll over when performing high-tension exercises.”

While they're easy to throw into a gym bag alone, it's nice that the Renoj bands come with a mesh bag to keep them in one place—which is why we gave them a five out of five score for portability. The included instructions were also helpful because they illustrated easy-to-follow exercises, great for both beginners and experienced users.

Tension Range: 20-35, 30-50, and 45-70 pounds | Material: Latex, polyester-blend | Style: Loop bands | Included Accessories: Carrying bag | Price at time of publication: $18

resistance bands test

Verywell Fit / Nick Kova

Best Budget Loop Bands: Insonder Resistance Bands Set

4.5
Insonder Mini Bands Set

Amazon

Our Ratings
  • Quality
    4.5/5
  • Resistance Accuracy
    4.5/5
  • Versatility
    4/5
  • Feel & Grip
    4.5/5
  • Portability
    5/5
Pros
  • Five resistance levels

  • Comes with a compact carrying bag

  • Clearly labeled resistance levels

Cons
  • May slip on wet skin

  • No instructions included

With five bands ranging in tension from 10 to 40 pounds, the Insonder Mini Bands are an affordable set of loop bands that can be used for a variety of exercises and stretches. The set is especially helpful for beginners who want to gradually increase the resistance of their bands over time as their strength improves

We found that all of the bands felt thick and durable despite the difference in resistance levels. Our tester also said that in comparison to other bands she tried, she felt comfortable even when using the lighter bands—knowing they wouldn't tear or snap. Another thing our tester appreciated was that the bands were easy to differentiate thanks to clearly labeled dots that corresponded with their resistance levels.

Latex-based loop bands can attract hair and dust due to static, but we found that the chalk-like residue coating these bands protected from the collection of debris. It also created a smooth surface that didn't pinch our skin during the test. With that said, we mimicked sweat by spraying water on our skin during exercises and found that the bands did slip slightly. But despite having to readjust the bands slightly during some moves, they still felt comfortable and easy to use on wet skin.

Testing Notes: “Grip-wise, these stayed in place on my leggings but I didn’t find that they were too sticky or painful. I liked that they weren’t slippery and that they didn’t bunch. The tension is really great and I liked that all levels provided a good workout. The heaviest really challenged me… but in a good way!”

Insonder's bands are super lightweight, but it was still nice that they came with a mesh carrying bag for easy transport. After all, with five bands to keep track of, it's easy to lose one going to and from the gym.

Tension Range: 10, 15, 20, 30, and 40 pounds | Material: Latex | Style: Loop bands | Included Accessories: Carrying bag | Price at time of publication: $8

resistance bands test

Verywell Fit / Nick Kova

Best Splurge Loop Bands: BC Strength Glute Loop Package

3.9
BC Strength Glute Loops

BC Strength

Our Ratings
  • Quality
    4.5/5
  • Resistance Accuracy
    4/5
  • Versatility
    3/5
  • Feel & Grip
    5/5
  • Portability
    3.5/5
Pros
  • Durable knit design

  • Grippy non-slip strip

  • Doesn't slide on wet skin

Cons
  • Expensive

  • Better for advanced users

Our testers agreed that the BC Strength Glute Loops were some of the most durable bands we tried over our two-day testing period. The six-pack will set you back a bit more cost-wise, but thanks to the high-quality knit fabric, we noted that they're likely to hold up to continuous wear over time.

The bands can be used for stretching and arm workouts, but we found them ideal for leg exercises like squats, hip thrusts, and clamshells. We completed these exercises in addition to some moderate stretching and found the bands to be comfortable without pinching our skin. Our tester noticed that the bands didn't budge or slip while in use thanks to the non-slip strip woven into the fabric, which is why they received a perfect score in the feel and grip category.

Although there are six bands included in the set, our testers noted that even the lightweight bands were pretty heavy—making them better for advanced users versus beginners. However, we appreciated that the set included two diameter sizes (S/M and L/XL) which offered the ability to complete more exercises with a single set, no matter your body size.

Testing Notes: “I noticed that the resistance is heavy and that the bands are incredibly strong and grippy! They’re high-quality and they seem durable. They’re best for experienced users because the lowest level of resistance was still heavy.”

In The Lab, we recorded a weight of 1.8 pounds for the set of six bands which makes them fairly easy to take on the go. But an included carrying bag would still have been a nice addition, especially for the higher price—which is why they snagged a moderate score in the overall value category.

Tension Range: Small- and large-diameter sets in regular, strong, and extra-strong (specific pounds are not listed in manufacturer’s product description) | Material: Latex, polyester-blend | Style: Loop bands | Included Accessories: None | Price at time of publication: $120

resistance bands test

Verywell Fit / Nick Kova

Best Overall Tube Bands: GoFit Extreme Pro Gym Set

4.7
GoFitExtreme

Amazon

Our Ratings
  • Quality
    5/5
  • Resistance Accuracy
    4.5/5
  • Versatility
    5/5
  • Feel & Grip
    4.5/5
  • Portability
    4.5/5
Pros
  • Multiple accessories included

  • Hardware and tubes are durable

  • Instructions included

Cons
  • Resistance levels might be slightly inaccurate

  • Heavy weight of set decreases portability

Loop bands are the most popular style of resistance bands, but we were still able to get a good workout with this collection of tube bands. Tube bands are more versatile and it's easy to incorporate them into a wide variety of exercises—especially upper body exercises. Plus, many of the bands we tested—like the GoFit Extreme Pro Gym Set—included multiple accessories to add a challenging element to our exercises.

Almost all of the tube bands we tested included a set of handles (either secured or detachable). These proved helpful because they allowed us to grasp the bands without fear of slipping when completing high-intensity moves like rows or squats. But what really stood out about the GoFit Extreme Pro Gym Set is the addition of high-quality door anchors and ankle straps—allowing for even more workout versatility.

The hardware of the accessories seemed high quality and we appreciated the foam on both the handles and the ankle straps. Scratching or discomfort can occur without comfortable, padded material —especially when performing exercises like resistance band kickbacks or door anchor rows—which is why this attribute was something that added to the overall quality of the GoFit Extreme set. Our tester also noticed that even when her hands were wet, they didn't slip.

Testing Notes: “If you want a band set that will give you a lot of options, this one is a good choice. It’s very durable and I noticed that the hardware was comfortable to use against my skin. I’d even spend a little more money on it if necessary.”

Since there are so many ways to use these bands, we found the instruction manual that came with them to be super helpful, especially with the easy-to-follow illustrations. We referred to the book a few times in The Verywell Testing Lab and it helped us use the tube bands to their full potential. This, in addition to the convenient carrying bag, were a couple of reasons this set rose above the other tube bands we tried out over the two-day testing period.

Tension Range: 20, 30, 40, and 50 pounds | Material: Latex | Style: Tube bands | Included Accessories: Two handles, two door anchors, two ankle straps, carrying bag | Price at time of publication: $70

resistance bands test

Verywell Fit / Nick Kova

Best Budget Tube Bands: Whatafit Resistance Bands Set

4.1
Whatafit Resistance Bands Set

Amazon

Our Ratings
  • Quality
    4/5
  • Resistance Accuracy
    3/5
  • Versatility
    4/5
  • Feel & Grip
    4/5
  • Portability
    5/5
Pros
  • Comes with a carrying bag

  • Multiple accessories included

  • Instructions included

Cons
  • Lighter bands may lack durability

  • Resistance levels might be slightly innacurate

If you're looking for affordability, the Whatafit Resistance Bands Set is a budget-friendly tube bands set that doesn't skimp on quality. Our tester found the bands very comfortable to use, and he noticed that even during the sweat test, his hands didn't slip on the handles. While the ankle straps didn't include the same quality of foam padding as the handles, discomfort didn't get in the way of completing his lower body exercises.

Tubes with tensions of 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 pounds are included in the box in addition to the ankle straps, handles, and a door anchor. Our in-Lab measurements for size didn't match the product description, but the resistance levels of the bands still ascended as expected from light to heavy.

While the latex tubes seemed durable, our tester did make note of the construction of the accessories—saying they didn't seem as durable as other pricier options on the list. But he still felt safe using the bands and accessories even when heavier exercises were completed in The Lab. The carabiner clips were an added bonus that offered an additional layer of safety.

Testing Notes: “If you’re looking for several resistance tube options on a budget, this set would be a good choice. The ankle straps and door anchor seemed a little flimsy, which is worth noting for heavier exercises. However, I never felt unsafe performing any of the exercises.”

Similar to some of the other resistance bands on our list, a small instruction booklet was included with the set. The exercises appeared fairly basic, but the thorough descriptions and illustrations made our testers without much experience feel more comfortable when using the bands. A carrying bag was also included and we liked that it offered a way to keep all of the tube bands and accessories in one place during travel.

Tension Range: 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 pounds | Material: Latex | Style: Tube bands | Included Accessories: Two handles, one door hanger, two ankle straps, carrying bag | Price at time of publication: $40

resistance bands test

Verywell Fit / Nick Kova

Best Power/Assist Bands: Serious Steel Assisted Pull-up Band

4.1
Serious Steel

Amazon

Our Ratings
  • Quality
    5/5
  • Resistance Accuracy
    4/5
  • Versatility
    3/5
  • Feel & Grip
    4/5
  • Portability
    4/5
Pros
  • Clearly labeled resistance levels

  • No slipping with wet or dry hands

  • Four bands for all experience levels

Cons
  • Not as portable as other sets

  • Versatility is limited

Loop bands and tube bands are optimal for total-body workouts, but if your main goal is to improve your pull-up game, the Serious Steel Assisted Pull-Up Bands are an ideal choice. Power bands are designed for use with our own body weight and they're different from other styles of resistance bands because they're longer, thicker, and made for heavier weight use. We found them to be great for pull-ups, though they weren't ideal for exercises like bicep curls or squats because of their tougher composition.

Since the Serious Steel set included four bands with multiple resistance options, testers of all experience levels were able to use the bands safely. One of our testers noted she liked having the option to start with an easier band that offered more resistance during her pull-ups and work her way up to using a band that offered less resistance (almost mimicking a bodyweight pull-up).

Testing notes: “This product feels super sturdy, and I think it’s a great choice for pull-ups. I did not feel worried that they were going to snap back at any moment, and I like that four bands are included because it allows people who’ve never done pull-ups to gradually progress to pulling up their own body weight.”

We noticed that the bands felt sturdy on both wet and dry skin, and they didn't feel like they would snap back at any point throughout the test. Our tester shared that an included instruction guide would have been helpful for workout guidance, but she did appreciate that the bands were color-coded based on their resistance levels—making it easy to select the ideal one for a particular exercise.

Tension Range: 5-35, 10-50, 25-80, and 50-120 pounds | Material: Latex | Style: Power/assist bands | Included Accessories: None | Price at time of publication: $83

resistance bands test

Verywell Fit / Nick Kova

Best Resistance Straps: Healthy Seniors Chair Exercise Program with Two Resistance Bands

4.3
Healthy Seniors Chair Exercise Program with Two Resistance Bands

Courtesy of Amazon

Our Ratings
  • Quality
    4.5/5
  • Resistance Accuracy
    4.5/5
  • Versatility
    4/5
  • Feel & Grip
    4/5
  • Portability
    4.5/5
Pros
  • Great for chair workouts

  • Written instructions included

  • Instructional video included

Cons
  • Bands may slip if not tied correctly

  • Handles aren't easy to attach to bands

Most of the bands on our list are designed to challenge you in your workout routine, but the Healthy Seniors Bands are lightweight and perfect for simple chair exercises and stretching. Our testers found the 18-page guide that came with these straps very useful and easy to understand and read—making it a good option for people needing more guidance. While none of our testers fall into the "older adult" age range, one of our testers noted this set may cater to elderly exercisers or those with physical limitations more than others on the market, thanks to the instruction guide featuring low-impact chair exercises.

Inside this set's box, we found two bands labeled “light” and “medium.” They were easy to use alone, as well as with the included handles. Our tester did make note of a slight safety concern for those with compromised dexterity—when the bands are loosely tied around the handles, they may snap back. She says that this can be fixed by double-knotting the bands instead.

Testing Notes: “I really enjoyed the booklet that includes pictures and instructions for a bunch of different chair exercises. The bands appear pretty durable and I can see them being extremely useful for older adults or for those confined to a wheelchair.”

Completing squats, bicep curls, and hamstring stretches was easy with this set thanks to the durable handles and straps. We can't say much in terms of long-term durability without further testing, but the latex construction should hold up to repeated stretching and continuous use. While a carrying bag is not included, the entire set only includes four lightweight pieces which we found easy to carry in a gym bag.

Tension Range: Light and medium (specific pounds are not listed in manufacturer’s product description) | Material: Latex | Style: Resistance straps | Included Accessories: Two handles | Price at time of publication: $26

resistance bands test

Verywell Fit / Nick Kova

Best Variety Pack: Kootek 18-Pack Resistance Bands Set

4.1
Kootek 18-Pack Resistance Bands Set

Courtesy of Amazon

Our Ratings
  • Quality
    4/5
  • Resistance Accuracy
    3/5
  • Versatility
    5/5
  • Feel & Grip
    4/5
  • Portability
    4/5
Pros
  • Multiple accessories included

  • Resistance tubes and loops in set

  • Affordable

Cons
  • Tubes aren't all the same length

  • Bands may slip on wet skin

The Kootek Resistance Bands Set is an 18-piece set that will give you resistance loops, resistance tubes, and everything you need to make the most of them. When unboxing the set, we were happy to see the sheer variety of items included.

The five latex resistance loops feature resistance levels between 5 and 40 pounds. Resistance loops are also included and offer resistance tension between 10 and 50 pounds. Thanks to the versatility of resistance levels, we found it easy to complete a wide range of at-home exercises with the set no matter our experience level.

Testing Notes: “I like that a bag is included to keep all of the tubes and accessories in one place. It’s also pretty helpful that loop bands came with the tube bands which allowed me to complete a wide range of exercises without having to purchase each separately.”

One of the main reasons the Kootek set secured a spot as our Best Variety Pack is because of the helpful accessories included. In addition to the tube bands and loop bands, two ankle straps, two handles, and a door anchor shipped in the box. Our tester was able to use each of these tools to craft a challenging total-body workout. The included core sliders (something we didn't find in any other resistance band set we tested) also offered an easy way to upgrade a home core workout routine.

Tension Range: 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 pounds (tube bands), 10, 15, 20, 30, and 40 pounds (loop bands) | Material: Latex | Style: Tube bands and loop bands | Included Accessories: Two handles, one door anchor, two ankle straps, carrying bag, five loop bands, two core sliders | Price at time of publication: $20

resistance bands test

Verywell Fit / Nick Kova

Final Verdict

Due to their durability, feel and grip, and portability, our testers agree that the Renoj Exercise Workout Bands deserve the title of the best overall loop bands. Characteristics such as the woven anti-slip grip strips and double-stitched fabric are designed to help the bands stay in place during exercises and last with continued use. They’re also fairly affordable—great for anyone wishing to experiment with resistance bands for the first time. 

But if you’re seeking bands that are better for arm workouts and stretching than for leg or glute exercises, the GoFit Extreme Pro Gym Set is a good choice. With four tube bands, two handles, two ankle straps, and two door anchors, the set is designed with versatility in mind. We also appreciated the in-depth instruction booklet designed to guide users of all experience levels.

How We Rated Resistance Bands

4.8 to 5 stars: These are the best resistance bands we tested. We recommend them without reservation.

4.5 to 4.7 stars: These resistance bands are excellent—they might have minor flaws, but we still recommend them.

4.0 to 4.5 stars: We think these are great resistance bands, but others are better.

3.5 to 3.9 stars: These resistance bands are just average.

3.4 and below: We don't recommend resistance bands with this rating; you won't find any on our list.

resistance bands test

Verywell Fit / Nick Kova

How We Tested the Resistance Bands

To determine the best resistance bands, members of the Verywell editorial team tested 20 resistance band sets in The Verywell Testing Lab. While testing, we focused on a variety of attributes, including quality, accuracy of measurements, versatility, feel and grip, and portability and storage. Comparing scores for each of these characteristics with the price of each individual set, we also came up with an “overall value” score. We then averaged the scores of these six attributes to calculate an overall rating for each set of bands. Since some bands scored high in one attribute category but low in others—such as high portability and low versatility for sets that included a single band—none of the resistance bands we tested received a perfect overall score. 

Seven testers—including a certified barre instructor and a certified personal trainer—spent two days and approximately 16 hours completing exercises such as squats, bicep curls, pull-ups, stretching, and more with the bands. We also weighed and measured the tension and dimension of the bands while making note of any smells, durability issues, or wear and tear prior to putting them to the test.

Each band was categorized into one of four categories, including loop bands, tube bands, power/assist bands, and resistance straps. Then, predetermined exercises were completed by the testers based on the type of resistance band being tested. Squats, lateral walks, and clamshells were performed with the loop bands. To test tube bands, we completed multiple reps of bicep curls, rows, shoulder presses, and shoulder/chest stretches. Resistance straps were put to the test with squats, split-stance shoulder presses, and hamstring stretches. And finally, pull-ups and one-arm bicep curls were carried out to test power/assist bands. If ankle straps were included, hip adduction/abduction exercises were performed, and other accessories were used according to their intended use. 

resistance bands test

Verywell Fit / Nick Kova

After completing each of the exercises accordingly, testers sprayed their hands and legs with water to see how the bands would perform during the same exercises if used on sweaty skin or in a humid environment.

Following the dry and wet exercise tests, we re-evaluated the bands by looking at their surface and stretching them to see if any wear was noticeable after use. Additionally, the bands and accessories that came with carrying bags were packed into the bags to see if all of the included pieces fit comfortably for easy transport. 

When determining the overall value of the resistance bands, we compared all of the attributes listed above to the price for all of the bands and accessories included in each set. Physical characteristics are a major factor in purchasing decisions, but a product may be out of reach for some buyers if the price is too high. While some sets were clearly more durable and versatile than others, they may have been rated lower for overall value if the price seemed expensive for what consumers get. 

Although the quality was noted throughout the two days of testing in The Verywell Testing Lab, our testers are continuing to use the resistance bands at home to examine their ability to hold up to wear and tear over time.

What to Look for in a Resistance Band

Style

Before buying a resistance band, you need to determine how you want to incorporate it into your workout routine. If you’re trying to challenge yourself during leg and glute workouts, a loop band might be best. For arm exercises like tricep extensions and bicep curls, you’ll be better off buying a tube band, like those in Whatafit's Resistance Bands Set. While loop bands (like tube bands) are particularly helpful for specific movements, they’re also versatile and can be incorporated into a total-body workout.

If you opt for a power/assist band like Serious Steel's Assisted Pull-Up Band, you’re probably trying to improve the form or intensity level of your pullups. These bands aren’t as versatile, but they can also be used for some forms of stretching. And if rehabilitation or low-impact exercises are part of your routine, opting for a resistance strap will give you optimal versatility for use with upper or lower body work.  

“Think about how you want to include resistance bands into your workouts, and that should help you decide which kind to go with,” says Gabby Drucker, personal trainer and owner of Drucker Fitness in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

resistance bands test

Tension Range

Nearly every set of resistance bands comes with a specific tension range—whether noted by level (light, medium, and heavy) or by pounds. Furthermore, some brands list the resistance tension range for each of their bands, rather than just for the set. 

It’s important to find a set with a minimum tension that works for your lighter exercises but a maximum tension that will prove challenging for heavier workout routines. This is where variety packs come in handy because they often offer anywhere from three to five resistance levels in one set. 

“Go with the variety pack,” says Drucker. “Heavier bands are great for lower body exercises, whereas you’ll want less resistance for your upper body.” With these multi-packs, you won’t have to worry about buying additional resistance bands to tackle different exercises. 

Material

No matter the type of resistance band, most of them are made with either rubber or latex. These materials are stretchy, long-lasting, and easy to clean. Rubber is typically more durable, but Drucker notes that latex offers a wider range of stretch for both high-impact and low-impact exercises. 

Though loop bands can also be made with these materials, you may also find some made with fabric, like our best overall pick, RenoJ's Resistance Bands Set. This comes in the form of a woven knit material—providing stretch without the fear of pinching or sliding on the skin.

Included Accessories

It’s evident that the most important part of a resistance band set is the resistance bands themselves. But if other accessories are included with your purchase, you may find that you can perform more workouts with a single set.

Some of the most popular accessories you’ll find in a workout band set are handles, ankle straps, and door anchors. Handles often clip onto tube bands with a carabiner clip and offer a secure place to hold the tubes comfortably. Ankle straps fit loosely around the ankles—making moves like hip adduction and hip abduction possible. And if the set includes door anchors, you’ll be able to complete kickbacks, rows, and other exercises that require the straps to be hooked to a secure area, easier.

resistance bands test

Verywell Fit / Nick Kova

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Do resistance bands actually build muscle?

    Since resistance bands are often used in the place of free weights, it’s natural to wonder whether they’ll actually help you build strength. But the truth is: They will. Several studies have suggested that working out with resistance bands can be a great way to activate muscles and build strength.

    The only thing worth noting? Because resistance bands are shaped differently than free weights, they may challenge your muscles in a slightly different way than free weights will. (One study found that resistance bands activated some muscles more than free weights did—and some muscles less than free weights did—when similar exercises were performed).

  • What can you expect to pay for resistance bands?

    A set of quality resistance bands usually costs between $20-$80. Cheaper bands may not be as durable, while more expensive options may come with unnecessary accessories. The cheapest set on our list, the Insonder Resistance Bands Set, is often available for less than $10. And our most expensive pick, the BC Strength Glute Loop Package, was $120 when we last updated this list.

  • How do you clean resistance bands?

    It’s always a good idea to keep your fitness equipment clean. Thankfully, cleaning your resistance bands is a pretty easy process. 

    If you have latex or rubber resistance bands, you’ll want to start by dipping them in a bath of warm water—with a few drops of dish soap mixed in. (Your sink is probably great for this.) Swish the bands around the soapy water. Then, pull them out and rinse them off with warm water. You’ll want to let your resistance bands air dry—but not in the sun. (The sun can actually cause your resistance bands to deteriorate!)

    If you have fabric resistance bands, you can likely toss them in your washing machine—and perhaps even in your dryer. Just be sure to check the care instructions for your resistance bands before trying this.

resistance bands test
Verywell Fit / Nick Kova.

Why Trust Verywell Fit 

Megan Foster is a seasoned commerce writer and former college athlete. She prioritizes health and fitness in her daily life, and she’s always looking for a new effective workout routine or fitness product to share with her readers. Megan regularly uses resistance bands while working out in the gym or at home. In The Verywell Testing Lab, she carefully evaluated the durability and versatility of each of the sets, while noting overall value and affordability.

Additional reporting by Lindsey Lanquist.

As a seasoned health and fitness writer, Lindsey Lanquist understands how vital quality product recommendations can be. She is careful to recommend products that are reliable, comfortable, and genuinely well-reviewed by those who’ve tried them.

4 Sources
Verywell Fit uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.
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  2. Patil P, Rao S. Effects of Thera-Band® elastic resistance-assisted gait training in stroke patients: a pilot studyEur J Phys Rehabil Med.

  3. Kozub FM, Voorhis T. Using bands to create technique-specific resistance training for developing explosive power in wrestlersStrength & Conditioning Journal.

  4. Bergquist R, Iversen VM, Mork PJ, Fimland MS. Muscle activity in upper-body single-joint resistance exercises with elastic resistance bands vs. Free weightsJournal of Human Kinetics. doi:10.1515/hukin-2017-0137