The 10 Best Protein Powders for Women of 2023, According to a Dietitian

Momentous Whey Protein Isolate is NSF Certified for Sport & has 20 g of protein

We independently research, test, review, and recommend the best products. Healthcare professionals review articles for medical accuracy. Learn more about our process. If you buy something through our links, we may earn a commission.

Best Protein Powders for Women

Verywell Fit / Kristin Kempa

Protein needs for women vary based on your age, activity levels, and overall health. Studies show that consuming protein before and after exercise supports muscle growth and recovery, although total daily protein intake is most important. While you can get all the protein you need from foods such as meat, poultry, fish, tofu, and legumes, a protein powder can be a convenient way to help you meet your needs. 

“​​For people who have a hard time meeting their protein needs via their diet, protein powder can help fill that gap. And since many women live very busy lives, it is understandable that some may have a hard time getting in enough of this important macro,” says Lauren Manaker, MS, RDN, LD, CLEC, CPT. Protein powders come in many varieties, but they are typically made from milk, pea, soy, rice, or hemp. They can be added to smoothies, baked goods, oatmeal, or mixed with a liquid of choice for a quick source of protein. 

Protein powders differ in their ingredients and protein levels though, so it is important to check labels and opt for third party tested powders. When considering protein powders, we looked at protein type and amount, sweetener source, and other ingredients. We prioritized protein powders with minimal ingredients, few added sweeteners, and with third party testing where possible.

Verywell Fit Approved Protein Powders for Women

Always speak with a healthcare professional before adding a supplement to your routine, to ensure that the supplement is appropriate for your individual needs and which dosage to take.

Best Overall

Momentous Recovery Protein

Momentous Essential Grass-Fed Whey Protein Isolate Chocolate

Amazon

Pros
  • NSF Certified for Sport and Informed Sport Certified

  • Whey protein isolate for easy digestion

Cons
  • Expensive

Momentous Essential tops our list of protein powders for women because it’s NSF Certified for Sport and is made with grass-fed whey protein isolate. Whey protein isolate is a form of whey, a milk protein, that is low in fat and lactose and is typically easily-digested. Their strong third party certifications mean this is a product you can trust, especially if you’re an athlete.

Each scoop of Momentous Essential Grass-Fed Whey contains 20 grams of protein, with 2.2 grams of leucine, an amino acid necessary for muscle growth. Momentous whey comes in chocolate or vanilla flavors, and can be added to your favorite smoothies, baked goods, oatmeal, or liquid of choice. It does not have added sugars and is instead sweetened with stevia, a zero calorie sweetener, which may or may not suit your preferences.

Since whey is derived from milk, it’s not suitable if you have a dairy allergy or are vegan. You may instead want to opt for Momentous’ vegan protein powder made from pea protein.

Price at time of publication: $54 ($2.20 per ounce)

Key Specs:
Protein type: Whey protein isolate | Serving Size: 1 scoop | Servings Per Container: 24 Calories: 100 | Protein: 20 grams | Carbs: 3 grams | Fat: 1.5 grams | Sweetener: Stevia

Best Tasting

Sprout Living Epic Protein Vanilla Lacuma

Sprout Living Epic Protein Vanilla Lacuma

Amazon

Pros
  • Suitable for vegans and vegetarians

  • No artificial flavors or additives

Cons
  • Contains stevia

With so many options on the market, it can be challenging to find a protein powder that tastes good. While this can be somewhat subjective, we think Sprout Living Epic Protein Vanilla Lacuma is a delicious option.

This plant-based protein powder contains 20 grams of protein per serving from yellow pea, sunflower seed, pumpkin seed, sacha inchi (a type of plant), and cranberry seed. It gets its flavor from a South American fruit called lacuma fruit, along with coconut milk, cinnamon, ginger root, vanilla bean, baobab fruit, coconut sugar, and stevia. It also contains jerusalem artichoke for a fiber boost, plus it provides you with some calcium, iron, and potassium.

This protein powder is somewhat higher in sodium, with 320 milligrams per serving. But this higher protein content may be a good thing if you are exercising in the heat or sweating heavily. In addition to vanilla, Sprout Living protein comes in chocolate maca and green kingdom flavors, which contains added greens. Their website mentions third party testing, but it does not provide further details.

Price at time of publication: $54 ($1.69/ounce)

Key Specs:
Protein type: Yellow pea, suflower seed, pumpkin seed, sacha inchi, cranberry seed | Serving Size: 2 scoops | Servings Per Container: 24 | Calories: 140 | Protein: 20 grams | Carbs: 13 grams | Fat: 3 grams | Sweetener: Coconut sugar, stevia

Best Pea Protein

Now Foods NOW Sports Nutrition Pea Protein

4.3
NOW Sports Pea Protein

Amazon

Pros
  • Informed Sport Certified

  • Single ingredient

  • Suitable for vegans and vegetarians

  • Contains 45% of the Daily Value of iron

Cons
  • Some may prefer flavored options

NOW Sports Nutrition Pea Protein is a plant-based protein powder made solely from pea protein isolate. Research shows pea protein can support athletic training in similar ways to whey protein, so this can be a great option if you have dairy allergies, are vegan or vegetarian, or simply want to try a plant-based powder. 

One scoop of NOW protein protein provides you with 24 grams of protein. It also contains 45 percent of your daily iron needs, which may be especially important if you menstruate and/or are vegetarian or vegan. This is because iron is lost through menstruation, and vegetarian and vegan diets do not always contain adequate iron.

This protein powder is unflavored, so it may be a good choice for adding to baked goods. If you prefer flavored powders, NOW also makes this powder in chocolate or vanilla flavors that are sweetened with stevia. We also like that this protein powder is available at a more affordable price than many other options.

Price at time of publication: $23 ($0.73 per ounce)

Key Specs:
Protein type: Yellow pea protein isolate | Serving Size: 1 scoop | Servings Per Container: 27 Calories: 120 | Protein: 24 grams | Carbs: 2 grams | Fat: 2 grams | Sweetener: None

Best Whey

Klean Athlete Klean Isolate

Klean Athlete Klean Isolate

Amazon

Pros
  • NSF Certified for Sport

  • Minimal ingredients

Cons
  • Expensive

Whey protein powder is derived from dairy and is often a popular choice when it comes to protein powders. This is for good reason—whey is a high quality, complete protein that our bodies typically easily digest and absorb. It also contains all of the essential amino acids, the building blocks of protein that we need to get from our diets. 

Whey protein is usually sold as either whey concentrate or whey isolate. Whey isolate is a bit lower in fat and lactose, although the difference is often slight. Klean Athlete Klean Isolate is a whey isolate powder. One scoop provides you with 20 grams of protein. 

This protein powder comes in vanilla and chocolate flavors, but if you prefer a more neutral powder, there is also an unflavored version. It is NSF Certified for Sport, so you don’t have to worry about possible contamination. It is sweetened with stevia and monk fruit extract.

Price at time of publication: $54 ($2.95 per ounce)

Key Specs:
Protein type: Whey protein isolate | Serving Size: 1 scoop | Servings Per Container: 20 Calories: 90 | Protein: 20 grams | Carbs: 3 grams | Fat: 0 | Sweetener: Stevia, monk fruit extract

Best Plant Based

Vega Sport Premium Vegan Protein Powder Chocolate

Vega Sport Premium Vegan Protein Powder Chocolate

Amazon

Pros
  • NSF Certified for Sport

  • Suitable for vegans and vegetarians

  • Contains 40% the of Daily Value of iron

Cons
  • More expensive

  • Some may not like taste

For a plant based protein powder that is also high quality, Vega Sport Premium Vegan Protein Powder is a great choice. One scoop of this powder provides you with 30 grams of protein, which is higher than many other protein powders.

This NSF Certified for Sport protein powder is derived from pea protein, pumpkin seed protein, sunflower seed protein, and alfalfa protein. It also contains various other ingredients, including tart cherry, beet root powder, turmeric extract, and black pepper extract. While tart cherry, beet root, and turmeric have all been studied for their ability to help promote recovery from exercise, the amounts are not listed on the product. Vega Sport protein powder is also sweetened with stevia leaf extract, which you may or may not enjoy.

Another plus for this protein powder is that it contains 7 milligrams of iron, which is 40 percent of the Daily Value. Iron deficiency can be common among female athletes, particularly vegetarians, so this extra boost may be a welcome addition.

Price at time of publication: $98 ($1.53 per ounce)

Key Specs:
Protein type: Pea protein, pumpkin seed protein, sunflower seed protein, and alfalfa protein | Serving Size: 1 scoop | Servings Per Container: 45 | Calories: 180 | Protein: 30 grams | Carbs: 6 grams | Fat: 4 grams | Sweetener: Stevia

Best Allergy-Friendly

Sprout Living Organic Pumpkin Seed Protein

Sprout Living Simple Pumpkin Seed Protein Powder

Amazon

Pros
  • Single ingredient

  • Suitable for vegans and vegetarians

  • No artificial flavors or additives

  • Contains 30% of the Daily Value of iron

Cons
  • Some may prefer flavored options

If you have allergies or food sensitivities, you may find it challenging to find a protein powder that works for you. Sprout Living Simple Pumpkin Seed Protein Powder, made with cold pressed pumpkin seed powder and nothing else, may be a great option. 

This protein powder contains 20 grams of protein per two scoops. Since it’s made from pumpkin seeds, it also contains 6 milligrams of iron, which is 30 percent of the Daily Value. This powder does not contain any flavorings or additives, which is a plus, especially for those with sensitivities. The light taste makes this protein powder easy to add to smoothies or other liquid of choice. While you can boost the flavor by adding to a fruit smoothie, you may find that you prefer a protein powder with a sweeter flavor.

Price at time of publication: $30 ($1.87/ounce)

Key Specs:
Protein type: Pumpkin seed | Serving Size: 2 scoops | Servings Per Container: 15 Calories: 102 | Protein: 20 grams | Carbs: 4 grams | Fat: 3 grams | Sweetener: None

Best Unflavored

Naked Whey Grass Fed Unflavored Whey Protein Powder

Naked Whey Grass Fed Unflavored Whey Protein Powder

Amazon

Pros
  • Informed Choice Certified

  • Single ingredient

  • No artificial flavors, sweeteners, or colors

Cons
  • May not be suitable for those with lactose intolerance

If you find that you dislike the taste of many protein powders, you might want to consider an unflavored option. These versatile protein powders are easy to add to smoothies and baked goods, and can be adjusted to your liking. Naked Whey Grass Fed Unflavored Whey Protein Powder is an Informed Choice Certified protein powder that contains whey protein concentrate and nothing else.

Whey protein concentrate is a form of whey protein that is slightly higher in fat and lactose when compared to whey protein isolate. This may be relevant if you are lactose intolerant, but whey concentrate is otherwise an excellent form of protein and has similar effects on the body. For two scoops of Naked Whey, you get 25 grams of protein and 2,982 milligrams of leucine.

If you find that you like this protein powder but do want a bit more flavor, they also make chocolate, vanilla, and strawberry versions.

Price at time of publication: $95 ($1.19/ounce)

Key Specs:
Protein type:
Whey protein concentrate | Serving Size: 2 scoops | Servings Per Container: 76 Calories: 120 | Protein: 25 grams | Carbs: 3 grams | Fat: 2 grams | Sweetener: None

Best With Collagen

Vital Proteins Collagen Peptides

Vital Proteins Collagen Peptides Powder 20 oz

Amazon

Pros
  • Contains 20 grams of collagen

  • Unflavored, easily dissolves

Cons
  • Low in leucine

Vital Proteins Collagen Peptides are a great choice if you’re looking for a collagen-based protein powder. Two scoops provides you with 18 grams of protein along with 20 grams of collagen peptides, a form of collagen that is easy to digest and absorb. This powder is unflavored, so it’s easy to add to a cold or hot beverage of choice. 

If you’re active, collagen supplements may help heal and prevent soft tissue and joint injuries. Keep in mind, however, that if your goal is to build muscle, you may want to opt for a protein powder with higher levels of leucine. 

Collagen powders are high in the amino acids glycine, proline, and hydroxyproline. They are lower in the branched chain amino acids including leucine, isoleucine, and valine, which are important for muscle synthesis and can be found in whey or pea protein powders.

Price at time of publication: $42 ($2.16/ounce)

Key Specs:
Protein type: Collagen | Serving Size: 2 scoops | Servings Per Container: 28 Calories: 70 | Protein: 18 grams | Carbs: 0 grams | Fat: 0 grams | Sweetener: None

Best Organic

Truvani Plant Based Protein Powder Vanilla

Truvani Plant Based Protein Powder Vanilla

Amazon

Pros
  • Certified USDA Organic

  • Short ingredient list

  • Suitable for vegans

Cons
  • Expensive

Truvani Plant Based Protein Powder is a certified USDA organic protein powder. One scoop provides you with 20 grams of protein from pea protein concentrate, pumpkin seed concentrate, and chia seed concentrate. Beyond that, this powder contains vanilla powder and organic Luo Han Guo, otherwise known as monk fruit, a non-nutritive sweetener. This powder is suitable for vegans and vegetarians.

In addition to vanilla, this protein powder comes in chocolate, banana cinnamon, and chocolate peanut butter flavors. Truvani states their formulas are tested in-house as well as sent for third party testing.

Price at time of publication: $28 ($2.67/ounce)

Key Specs:
Protein type: Pea protein, pumpkin seed, chia seed | Serving Size: 1 scoop | Servings Per Container: 20 Calories: 130 | Protein: 20 grams | Carbs: 5 grams  | Fat: 3 grams | Sweetener: Monk fruit

Best for Athletes

Garden of Life Sport Organic Plant-Based Protein Powder

Garden of Life Sport Organic Plant-Based Protein Powder

Vitamin Shoppe

Pros
  • NSF Certified for Sport

  • High levels of protein

  • Suitable for vegans

  • Contains notable amounts of iron, zinc, & calcium

Cons
  • Unclear amounts of tart cherry & turmeric

Garden of Life Organic Vegan Sport Protein Powder is an NSF Certified for Sport high quality protein powder. Two scoops provides you with 30 grams of protein, 7 grams of carbs, and 3 grams of fat. The protein comes from a blend of peas, navy beans, lentils, garbanzo beans, and cranberry seed, making this a great choice for those who are plant-based as well.

This protein powder also contains tart cherry and turmeric, ingredients that have been studied for their anti-inflammatory properties and ability to help support post-exercise recovery. But the label does not indicate specific amounts. 

Garden of Life also provides you with 6.7 milligrams of iron, which is 40% of the Daily Value, as well as 5 milligrams of zinc (45 percent of the Daily Value) and 180 milligrams of calcium (15 percent of the Daily Value). If you follow a vegan diet, you are at greater risk of deficiencies in these vitamins, so this protein powder can help give you a boost.

Price at time of publication: $34 ($1.19/ounce)

Key Specs:
Protein type: Pea, navy bean, lentils, garbanzo bean, cranberry | Serving Size: 2 scoops | Servings Per Container: 19 | Calories: 160 | Protein: 30 grams | Carbs: 7 grams  | Fat: 3 grams | Sweetener: Stevia

Is Protein Powder Beneficial for Women?

Protein powder is not necessary if you are able to meet your needs through diet. Protein can be found in meat, poultry, fish, dairy products, tofu, tempeh, beans, and lentils. But there are certain situations in which a protein powder may be beneficial.

  • Active individuals: Protein needs are higher for those who are active. According to the American College of Sports Medicine, those engaging in endurance exercise and strength training should consume 1.2 to 2.0 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight. You also need to make sure you’re eating enough overall, as total daily intake is important for optimal protein use.
  • Vegan and vegetarian athletes: If you are an active individual and you do not consume animal products, you may be at risk for lower intakes of protein. While it is certainly possible to meet your needs through vegetarian sources such as soy, beans, and legumes, a protein powder may help you meet your elevated needs.
  • Those who are low on time: If you have a busy schedule and find it challenging to cook meals, a protein powder can be a convenient option. You can mix protein powders with a liquid of choice and take them on the go.
  • Those who are pregnant or lactating: If a healthcare provider approves, protein powders can come in handy if you are pregnant or lactating . Manaker says, “If a woman is pregnant and experiencing nausea or food aversions, adding protein powder to smoothies can be an easy way to include [protein] in the diet in an easy-to-tolerate way. Nursing/lactating women tend to have a hard time including enough protein in their diets, which is needed for postpartum healing. Protein powder can be added to recipes to give a boost of protein with little effort.”
  • Those with osteoporosis: Lauren Torrisi-Gorra, MS, RD, says women who are prone to osteoporosis (a disease that weakens bones) might benefit from a higher protein intake, which is associated with a lower risk of fracture. Protein powders may be one way to help you increase your intake.
  • Those with higher protein needs: Protein needs may be increased if you have certain health conditions such as injuries, burns, or a cancer diagnosis. A protein powder can be a convenient way to help you meet your elevated needs, particularly if appetite is low.

Women Who May Not Benefit From Protein Powder

Protein powders are not always necessary, and in some cases should be avoided. Torrisi-Gorra cautions against consuming more than 2 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight for optimal health and digestive comfort. The following groups may not benefit from a protein powder:

  • Those consuming a balanced diet: If you eat a balanced diet with a mix of protein rich foods, you do not need a protein powder. Protein powders can be convenient, but they are often not a necessity.
  • Those with allergies: Many protein powders are made from dairy products, in particular those that are casein or whey based, while others are made in facilities that process other common allergens. If you have allergies or other sensitivities, be certain to carefully check labels.
  • Those taking certain medications: If you are taking medication, we recommend discussing protein powders with a healthcare provider to determine if they are appropriate for you. Whey protein powders may delay the effect of drugs such as certain antibiotics or Levodopa.
  • Those with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD): If you have CKD, you will likely need to be mindful of your protein intake. Torrisi-Gorra says it may be best for CKD patients to skip the protein powders and work with a healthcare provider. 

How We Select Supplements

Our team works hard to be transparent about why we recommend certain supplements; you can read more about our dietary supplement methodology here

We support supplements that are evidence-based and rooted in science. We value certain product attributes that we find to be associated with the highest quality products. We prioritize products that are third-party tested and certified by one of three independent, third-party certifiers: USP, NSF, or ConsumerLab.com. 

It's important to note that the FDA does not review dietary supplements for safety and effectiveness before they go to market. Our team of experts has created a detailed, science-backed methodology to choose the supplements we recommend.

What to Look For in Protein Powders for Women

Third-Party Testing

Supplements that are third-party tested are sent to a lab where they are tested to ensure they contain what they say they contain and are not contaminated with specific high-risk, common contaminants. However, it’s important to note:

  • Third party testing does not test to see if a product is effective or safe for everyone, and it does not ensure the supplement will not interact with other supplements or medications.
  • Not all third-party testing is created equal. It is not uncommon for supplement companies to pay labs for certificates after conducting minimal to no testing. 
  • The third party certifications we can trust are: ConsumerLab.com, NSF, and USP. However, these certifications are difficult to obtain and/or expensive for manufacturers, so many companies choose not to get their products tested by one of these three organizations. 
  • Sometimes products tested by these three companies are more expensive to try to offset the cost they pay for certification.
  • Just because a supplement is not tested by one of these three companies, it does not mean it’s a bad product. We recommend doing some research on the reputability of the manufacturer, and calling up the manufacturer and their testing lab to determine their protocols and decide if you feel comfortable consuming the supplement.

Protein powders, especially those that are plant based, may contain trace amounts of heavy metal picked up from soil and water. However, these trace amounts are unlikely to be harmful when consumed in typical amounts. Opting for third party tested protein powders when possible can ensure your protein powder is safe.

Form

Protein powders typically come in powdered form and can be added to a liquid of choice or mixed into baked goods.

Protein powders are derived from either animal or plant sources. Common animal-derived protein powders are made from whey, casein, and collagen, while plant-based powders are made from pea protein, brown rice protein, hemp, soy, nuts, or seeds. When deciding which type of protein powder is best for you, consider the protein type, taste, price, and any potential allergies or sensitivities.

Ingredients & Potential Interactions

It is essential to carefully read the ingredient list and nutrition facts panel of a supplement to know which ingredients and how much of each ingredient is included, relative to the recommended daily value of that ingredient. Please bring the supplement label to a healthcare provider to review the different ingredients contained in the supplement and any potential interactions between these ingredients and other supplements and medications you are taking.

Protein powders will differ in their ingredient lists, so it’s important to read labels. Protein powders may contain the following:

Sweeteners: Many protein powders contain sweeteners. This may be in the form of caloric sweeteners such as sugar, or, more commonly these days, as non-nutritive sweeteners such as stevia, monk fruit, sugar alcohols such as xylitol, or artificial sweeteners like sucralose. Sugar alcohols may cause digestive upset in some. If you want to avoid added sweeteners, opt for unflavored options. 

Performance enhancers: Protein powders geared towards athletes may contain performance enhancers such as caffeine, BCAAs, creatine, and others. Some of these ingredients are supported by research, while others are not. Before using these products, it is best to check the NIH Office of Dietary Supplements review of supplements for performance.

Allergens: If you have a dairy allergy, you should avoid dairy-based protein powders made from whey or casein. Other common allergens found in protein powders include nuts and soy. 

Additives: Protein powders sometimes contain added ingredients that may interact with certain medications, such as vitamins, minerals, caffeine, or herbs. If you are taking medications, we recommend speaking with a healthcare provider before using a protein powder.

Protein Dosage

The Daily Recommended intake for protein is 0.8 grams per kilogram of body weight. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and the American College of Sports Medicine recommend active individuals obtain 1.2 to 2.0 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight, or 0.5 to 0.9 grams of protein per pound. Older adults should aim for 1.0-1.2 grams per kilogram. Protein intake should be spread throughout the day.

Manaker says those with higher needs such as active individuals, as well as busy women, may benefit from a protein powder. However, consuming protein beyond your needs will not result in added benefits.

How Much is Too Much?

High intakes of protein are generally safe, and there is no Upper Limit for protein. However, consuming excess protein will not provide added benefit. In certain cases, consuming excessive amounts of protein may put extra stress on the bones, kidney, and liver.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Should women take protein powder?

    Not all women need protein powder. It is very possible to meet your protein needs through food alone. Protein powders can, however, be a convenient option, especially on busy days or if you have a hard time including a high quality source of protein at each meal.

  • What type of protein powder is best for women?

    There is no one type of protein powder that is best for all women. Choosing a protein powder will depend on factors such as your particular needs, taste preferences, dietary practices, or allergies and sensitivities. 

    It may take some trial and error to find one that you like. Don’t force yourself to use a protein powder that you don’t like the taste of—find one that has a pleasant or neutral flavor and texture. We also recommend opting for a protein powder that has been third party tested when possible.

  • How much whey protein should a woman consume daily?

    The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and the American College of Sports Medicine recommend active individuals obtain 1.2 to 2.0 grams of protein per kilogram of bodyweight. Torrisi-Gorra says it can sometimes be difficult to reach these amounts with whole foods, making protein powders a helpful option. 

    There are no official recommendations for whey protein powder dosage, but whey protein powders typically contain 20 to 30 grams. High doses of whey protein can result in side effects such as acne, nausea, bloating, fatigue, and headaches, so it’s important to get other forms of protein outside of whey, preferably through food. It is also best to spread protein intake out throughout the day.

  • What is the best protein powder for women for weight loss?

    Weight is highly individual, so what works for one woman may not work for another. Hyper-focusing on weight loss may actually hold you back from working towards improving your health and wellbeing. Shifting to healthier habits may lead to weight loss, but if it doesn’t, don’t be discouraged. By changing your behaviors, you are still improving your overall health, whether or not the number on the scale changes. While protein powder may be one part of the equation, what you eat throughout the day has the greatest impact on your health. 

    Including protein at each meal can help with general feelings of fullness and satisfaction. In order to make lasting changes, it is important to make sure you are eating enough to feel satisfied. Skipping meals or eating too few calories may lead to binging and weight gain later on. 

    Consider how you will use the protein powder—as a protein boost or in a shake as a meal replacement—when you select the optimal product. For example, collagen powder mixes well into a fruit and vegetable smoothie, but it may not be enough on its own, especially after exercising.

Why Trust Verywell Fit

Tamar Kane, MS, RD is a Registered Dietitian and marathon runner. Tamar has her master's degree in nutrition and exercise physiology from Teachers College Columbia University and specializes in working with plant-based athletes in need of quick protein sources. She often turns to protein powders as a quick and convenient way to boost post-exercise recovery.

Our team works hard to be transparent about why we recommend certain supplements; you can read more about our dietary supplement methodology here

14 Sources
Verywell Fit uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.
  1. Cintineo HP, Arent MA, Antonio J, Arent SM. Effects of protein supplementation on performance and recovery in resistance and endurance training. Front Nutr. 2018;5:83. doi:10.3389/fnut.2018.00083

  2. Babault N, Païzis C, Deley G, et al. Pea proteins oral supplementation promotes muscle thickness gains during resistance training: a double-blind, randomized, Placebo-controlled clinical trial vs. Whey protein. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition. 2015;12(1):3. doi:10.1186/s12970-014-0064-5

  3. Whey protein. Drugs.com.

  4. Fernandez-Jimenez MC, Moreno G, Wright I, Shih PC, Vaquero MP, Remacha AF. Iron deficiency in menstruating adult women: much more than anemia. Women’s Health Reports. 2020;1(1):26-35. doi:10.1089/whr.2019.0011

  5. Iron. National Institutes of Health.

  6. Alaunyte, I., Stojceska, V. & Plunkett, A. Iron and the female athlete: a review of dietary treatment methods for improving iron status and exercise performance. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2015;12(38). doi:10.1186/s12970-015-0099-2

  7. Clark KL, Sebastianelli W, Flechsenhar KR, et al. 24-Week study on the use of collagen hydrolysate as a dietary supplement in athletes with activity-related joint painCurrent Medical Research and Opinion. 2008;24(5):1485-1496. doi:10.1185/030079908X291967

  8. Nutrition and athletic performance. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise. 2009;41(3):709-731. doi:10.1249/MSS.0b013e31890eb86

  9. High protein diet. Drugs.com.

  10. Whey protein. Medline Plus.

  11. A human health risk assessment of heavy metal ingestion among consumers of protein powder supplements. Toxicology Reports.

  12. Jäger R, Kerksick CM, Campbell BI, et al. International society of sports nutrition position stand: protein and exercise. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition. 2017;14(1):20. doi:10.1186/s12970-017-0177-8

  13. Thomas DT, Erdman KA, Burke LM. Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Dietitians of Canada, and the American College of Sports Medicine: Nutrition and Athletic Performance. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. 2016;116(3):501-528. doi:10.1016/j.jand.2015.12.006

  14. Delimaris I. Adverse effects associated with protein intake above the recommended dietary allowance for adults. ISRN Nutrition. 2013;2013:1-6. doi:10.5402/2013/126929