The 11 Best Protein Powders for Men of 2023, According to a Dietitian

NOW Sports Whey Protein is Informed Sport certified and has 25 grams of protein

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Best Protein Powders

Verywell / Sabrina Jiang

Protein powder can be a helpful supplement if you struggle to meet your protein needs from food alone. While many people can meet their protein needs without supplementation, some people, such as athletes, vegans, or those with a high muscle mass, may struggle to get enough protein. Athletes or highly active individuals can have over double the protein needs of sedentary individuals, which can make it difficult to meet protein needs through food alone. Men’s protein needs can also be higher than women’s because they tend to weigh more and can have more muscle mass.

 Protein powders may consist of protein alone, or they may contain other ingredients such as added sweeteners, flavorings, or micronutrients. For those who are looking to build muscle, protein powder—when taken after a strength-training workout—can help to repair and strengthen muscles that have been broken down during the workout.

Enjely Mora, MS, RDN, LDN, sports dietitian at Metrowest Nutrition says, “Protein powder can certainly support the process of building muscle. Muscle growth does require a training program specifically focused on muscle growth plus adequate protein.” Since protein powder is a portable option, it can be a convenient way to support muscle growth.

Verywell Fit Approved Protein Powders for Men


Always speak with a healthcare professional before adding a supplement to your routine, to ensure that the supplement is appropriate for your individual needs and which dosage to take.

Is Protein Powder Beneficial for Men?

Protein powder can be beneficial for men with especially high protein needs, such as those who are athletes or otherwise very active. It can serve as an easy means of refueling after a strength-training workout to build muscle and support recovery. 

Men who can particularly benefit from protein powder include: 

  • Athletes. Endurance athletes’ protein needs are higher than those of an average sedentary adult, but strength-based athletes’ protein needs can be even higher. Therefore, especially as a strength-based athlete, you may benefit from a protein supplement. Endurance athletes may best benefit from focusing on a carbohydrate-based supplement instead of a protein powder. If you are not a competitive athlete but regularly lift weights, you may likely still benefit from a protein powder, especially if you exercise for longer than an hour most days of the week with a training plan that increases your reps, time, or lifting amount.
  • People following a plant-based diet. One common concern for people eating plant-based can be not getting enough or a variety of plant protein. Plant-based protein can be lower in digestibility and lower in leucine—one of the primary amino acids used for building muscle. While there are plenty of plant-based protein food options, such as beans, tofu, nuts, and seeds, if you do not eat enough of these foods, you may not be meeting your protein needs, especially if you are an athlete. Protein powder, specifically pea or soy protein powders, can be an easy, effective means of boosting your protein intake. 
  • People on-the-go. When you’re on-the-go, it can be hard to get complete meals in regularly. Protein powder can be a helpful resource if you need an easy, portable meal or snack. For example, you can have a well-balanced smoothie for breakfast using protein powder, milk, fruits, and veggies.

Who Might Not Benefit from Protein Powder?

  • People who consume a variety of food sources of protein. Over-consumption of protein can be unnecessary, and potentially taxing on the kidneys at very high levels. Getting too much protein could mean that you aren’t getting enough carbohydrates or fat, both important nutrients for your body. Therefore, if you consume a variety of food sources of protein, you can likely meet your protein needs without a supplement. 
  • People who are sedentary or minimally active. If you are generally healthy and inactive or moderately active, then your protein needs are likely achievable through food alone. 
  • People with kidney problems. Because over-consumption of protein can be taxing on the kidneys, you may want to be careful with protein powder intake if you have a kidney problem. Protein powder has high amounts of protein in a small volume, so it can be easier to exceed protein needs. Consult with your doctor before beginning a protein powder regimen.

Best Overall

NOW Sports Nutrition Whey Protein Isolate Unflavored Powder 1.2-Pound

now-sports-nutrition-whey-protein-isolate-unflavored-powder

Amazon

Pros
  • Informed Sport certified

  • Two ingredients

  • Free from most common food allergens

  • A source of calcium

Cons
  • Not suitable for a vegan diet

Now Foods is a trusted brand in protein powders, as they are Informed Sport certified—a third party organization that tests every batch for prohibited substances and ensures products are manufactured to high-quality standards. This is our best overall pick because it is a trusted brand with a simple product containing only whey protein isolate and sunflower lecithin. 

This pick is unflavored, making it easy to add to a variety of sweet or savory ways. We also chose this as our best overall pick because protein used is whey protein isolate. Whey protein is a high quality source of protein with high bioavailability and easy digestibility.

This protein powder contains 25 grams of protein per serving and 10% Daily Value of calcium. It is made with non-GMO ingredients and free from many common allergens. The isolated whey protein means the lactose content is minimal. Therefore, it could be a good choice for some individuals with lactose intolerance. 

 Price at time of publication: $26 ($1.37 per serving)

Key Specs:
Protein source:
whey protein isolate | Serving size: 1/3 cup | Protein per serving: 25 grams | Other ingredients: sunflower lecithin

Best Budget

Optimum Nutrition Gold Standard Whey

Optimum Nutrition Gold Standard Whey

Amazon

Pros
  • Informed Choice certified

  • Source of calcium

  • Affordable price

Cons
  • Contains artificial flavors and sweeteners

  • Not suitable for a vegan diet

If you’re looking for an affordable, trustworthy, flavored protein powder, we recommend Optimum Nutrition Gold Standard 100% Whey Protein. This powder is made with a whey protein blend with whey protein isolate, concentrate, and hydrolyzed whey protein. Each serving of this protein powder has 24 grams of protein per serving and provides 10% Daily Value of calcium.

A blended whey protein can be a more affordable whey option without sacrificing any quality. A whey blend will have small amounts of fat and carbohydrate that will be higher than those of a powder that is made just from whey isolate. Because it is not solely whey protein isolate, it does contain some lactose (an amount comparable to an ounce of cheddar cheese). If you are very sensitive to lactose, this might not be the best choice. It is also not suitable for a milk or soy allergy. 

We like that this powder is Informed Choice certified, meaning it is regularly tested for banned substances. It has a chocolate flavor that comes from cocoa powder, artificial, and natural flavors, and it is sweetened with acesulfame potassium, an FDA-approved artificial sweetener. Some may appreciate that it does not have added sugar, but some may also not want the artificial sweeteners and flavors in this protein powder. 

Price at time of publication: $84 ($1.14 per serving)

Key Specs:
Protein source:
whey protein isolate, whey protein concentrate, hydrolyzed whey protein | Serving size: 1 scoop | Protein per serving: 24 grams | Other ingredients: cocoa powder, sunflower and/or soy lecithin, natural and artificial flavor, acesulfame potassium

Best for Weight Gain

PB&Me Organic Powdered Peanut Butter, No Sugar Added

PB&Me Organic Powdered Peanut Butter

Amazon

Pros
  • Only one ingredient

  • Easily added to many foods

  • Budget-friendly

  • Suitable for vegan diets

Cons
  • Lower protein per serving

PB&Me is a unique, versatile option for a protein powder that could easily be used many times per day. It is essentially peanut butter with the oil removed, leaving you with organic peanut powder rich in protein. It is suitable for vegan and gluten-free diets.

You can add water to make it a paste, or you can enjoy the powder in a variety of foods, such as baked goods, yogurt, oatmeal, and smoothies. This protein powder can be added to many foods, making it an easy way to help someone get extra protein, total calories, and carbohydrates to meet their health goals.

It contains four grams of carbohydrates per serving, which is higher than some protein powders. These carbohydrates can help restore your glycogen stores and could be helpful for athletes with higher carbohydrate needs, especially if multiple servings are used throughout the day. Unlike most protein powders, a serving also provides two grams of fiber.

Since this product is easy to add to a variety of foods, it can be a great addition for those who are looking to gain weight. Enhance smoothies by adding a few tablespoons, or sprinkle it on yogurt or oatmeal to add a tasty peanut flavor and boost your caloric intake.

Price at time of publication: $20 ($1.18 per serving)

Key Specs:
Protein source:
peanuts | Serving size: 2 tablespoons | Protein per serving: 6 grams | Other ingredients: N/A 

Best Whey

Nutricost Grass-Fed Whey Protein Isolate

Nutricost Grass-Fed Whey Protein Isolate

Amazon

Pros
  • A source of calcium

  • One ingredient

  • Third-party tested

  • Sourced from grass-fed cows

Cons
  • More expensive than other whey protein isolate powders

Nutricost’s Grass-Fed Whey Protein Isolate is a simple, high-protein option—30 grams per 1/3 cup serving. We like that this choice is from grass-fed cows and is third-party tested for ingredient amounts and heavy metals. 

This protein powder with whey protein isolate has minimal lactose making it a viable option for most with mild lactose intolerance. It also contains 8% Daily Value for calcium, uses non-GMO ingredients, and is gluten-free. 

For men who are looking to build muscle, whey protein can be a great choice. Susana Meléndez, RDN, LD, and head of football nutrition at the University of Arizona says, “Whey protein powder contains leucine (basically, known as the ‘switch” or “trigger’ for muscle protein synthesis), which provides a convenient way to achieve those goals, especially for those with high protein needs.” 

We like the unflavored version, because it is free from added or artificial sugars and can easily be used with a variety of drinks or foods. Other grass-fed whey protein isolate flavors are chocolate and vanilla. If you want more flavors, Nutricost has whey protein isolate (not grass-fed) in mocha, salted caramel, cake batter, chocolate peanut butter, strawberry acai, and cookies and cream.  

Price at time of publication: $45 ($1.67 per serving)

Key Specs:
Protein source:
whey protein isolate | Serving size: 1/3 cup | Protein per serving: 30 grams | Other ingredients: N/A

Best Organic

Nutiva Organic Plant Protein Powder

Nutiva Organic Plant Protein Powder

Courtesy of Amazon

Pros
  • Suitable for most diets

  • Good source of vitamins and iron

  • 2 grams of fiber per serving

  • Certified organic

Cons
  • Not third-party tested

Nutiva’s Organic Plant Protein Superfood Smoothie can make for a good protein powder for men who want more than just protein. This protein powder contains a wide range of micronutrients, thanks to Nutiva’s powdered fruit and vegetable blend. For example, in addition to 23 grams of protein per serving, it provides at least 25% Daily Value of vitamins A, C, D, E, and K, and many B vitamins. It also provides 15% Daily Value of iron. The protein is from a blend of organic peas, sunflower, pumpkin, and hemp seeds.

It has inulin added, which provides most of the two grams of fiber per serving and can help men meet the recommended 30 to 35 grams of fiber per day. One thing to keep in mind is that this product does not have third-party testing, and some might not want or need the added probiotic and digestive enzymes.  

This protein powder can fit most diets, as it is vegan, non-GMO, soy-free, and gluten-free. However, it does have coconut milk, so it is not recommended if you have a coconut allergy. It has no added sugar or stevia and is sweetened with monk fruit extract.

Price at time of publication: $30 ($1.50 per serving)

Key Specs:
Protein source:
pea, sunflower, pumpkin, hemp seed | Serving size: 1 scoop (31 grams) | Protein per serving: 23 grams | Other ingredients: organic creamer base, organic natural flavors, fruit and vegetable blend, himalayan sea salt, organic cinnamon, d-alpha tocopherol, bifidobacterium longum, digestive enzyme blend

Best Vegan

Ritual Essential Protein Daily Shake 18+

Ritual Essential Protein Daily Shake 18+

Amazon

Pros
  • Informed Sport and Informed Protein certified

  • A source of calcium and iron

  • 3 grams of fiber per serving

Cons
  • Expensive

Ritual’s Essential Protein Daily Shake is a vanilla-flavored, plant-based protein powder that has 20 grams of protein per serving. It uses pea protein and also has methionine added to provide a complete protein with all essential amino acids

This protein powder uses monk fruit extract and reb-m, a sugar-free sweetener from fermented sugar cane, for a sweetener to keep the sugar amount to zero grams per serving. Other ingredients include natural vanilla flavor, organic medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) oil, xanthan gum, salt, sunflower lecithin, and mixed tocopherols.

While it does have a higher sodium level than other protein powders—13% daily value—this amount could be helpful for replacing lost electrolytes after long workouts.

We love that this product is Informed Sport certified, meaning that each batch is tested for banned substances. This protein powder is the first plant-based protein to be Informed Protein certified, meaning that it is tested for protein amount, heavy metals, and pesticide levels. Ritual also has traceable ingredients for their products.

This vegan protein is free from common allergens, making it suitable for various dietary needs. It is also a good source of fiber, with three grams per serving. Getting enough fiber in the diet is important for men, as it can promote digestive health, cholesterol management, and blood sugar stability.

Ritual offers a subscription service with some perks like free shipping, but you also have the option to purchase products without a subscription. 

Price at time of publication: $45 ($3 per serving)

Key Specs:
Protein source:
pea protein | Serving size: 1 scoop (30 grams) | Protein per serving: 20 grams | Other ingredients: organic coconut medium-chain triglyceride oil, xanthan gum, salt, sunflower lecithin, Reb-M, mixed tocopherols, organic monk fruit extract

Best Flavored

NAKED Nutrition Less Naked Whey

NAKED Nutrition Less Naked Whey

Courtesy of Amazon

Pros
  • Informed Choice certified

  • Only three ingredients

  • Sourced from grass-fed cows

  • A source of calcium

Cons
  • May not be sweet enough for all

If you’re looking for a flavored protein powder without artificial or filler ingredients, we recommend Naked Vanilla Whey Protein. Besides whey protein concentrate from grass-fed cows, the only other ingredients are coconut sugar and natural vanilla flavoring. Because of the simple ingredients, some may find the flavor is not as strong as other artificially flavored protein powders. 

Each serving has 25 grams of protein and five grams of added sugars. It is certified gluten-free and free from soy and GMOs. It is another Informed Choice certified option, so you can feel secure that this product is tested for contamination with banned substances.

Since it is whey protein concentrate rather than whey protein isolate, there are some natural amounts of sugars and fats, albeit minimal in comparison to its protein content. This product is also a source of calcium with 8% Daily Value per serving. 

Price at time of publication: $24 ($2.00 per serving)

Key Specs:
Protein source:
whey protein concentrate | Serving size: 2 scoops (7.2 tablespoons) | Protein per serving: 25 grams | Other ingredients: organic coconut sugar, organic natural flavor

Best Casein

Dymatize Elite Casein Chocolate Protein Powder

Pros
  • Informed Choice certified

  • No added sugars

  • High in calcium

Cons
  • Contains artificial sweeteners

Casein is another dairy-based protein source containing all nine essential amino acids, and it contains more calcium than whey protein. It is digested and absorbed more slowly than whey, potentially helping to promote muscle recovery overnight if consumed after exercise and 30 minutes before sleep.

We recommend Dymatize’s Elite Casein Protein Powder, as it contains 45% Daily Value of calcium and an impressive 25 grams of protein per serving. It also contains 8% Daily Value of iron and potassium. We like that it is Informed Choice certified, so it is a good choice for athletes. Of note, it does contain artificial sweeteners, which may not be everybody’s preference.

Price at time of publication: $100 ($2 per serving)

Key Specs:
Protein source:
micellar casein | Serving size: 2 scoops (36 grams) | Protein per serving: 25 grams | Other ingredients: sunflower creamer, cocoa powder, natural flavors, salt, sucralose, acesulfame potassium, potassium chloride, cellulose gum, xanthan gum, sunflower lecithin

Best Pea

NOW Foods Organic Pea Protein

NOW Foods Organic Pea Protein

Amazon

Pros
  • Informed Sport certified


  • A good source of iron

  • Budget-friendly

Cons
  • Lower protein per serving

Pea protein is a vegan-friendly protein powder choice that contains all nine essential amino acids. We recommend NOW Sports Organic Pea Protein, as it is budget-friendly, Informed Sport certified, certified organic, and non-GMO verified. It is also suitable for those looking for a vegan protein powder that is soy-free. NOW Sports also has extensive in-house testing for ingredient accuracy and for contaminants.

Note the protein content is slightly lower than other options at 15 grams per serving, but it provides an impressive 30% Daily Value of iron. We like that you can add this protein powder to a variety of options, since it is unflavored and free from sweeteners.

Price at time of publication: $23 ($0.67 per serving)

Key Specs:
Protein source:
organic yellow pea protein isolate | Serving size: 2 scoops (20 grams) | Protein per serving: 15 grams | Other ingredients: N/A

Best Combination

PlantFusion Complete Protein, Creamy Vanilla Bean

PlantFusion Complete Protein

Amazon

Pros
  • Third-party tested

  • Certified vegan

  • Good source of iron

  • Free of common food allergens

Cons
  • Higher in sodium

PlantFusion’s amino-acid infused protein blend offers 21 grams of plant-based protein per serving and is free of common food allergens. This combination of vegetables, legumes, and grains acts as complementary proteins, offering a vegan protein powder with all nine essential amino acids. We like that this protein powder is third-party tested, certified vegan, non-GMO, and free from common allergens.  

It is rather high in sodium—17% Daily Value per serving—so, be mindful if you have a condition that warrants limited sodium consumption. Each serving provides 22% Daily Value of iron, and this protein powder does not have any added sugar. However, it does use stevia and monk fruit extract for sweetness, which might not appeal to everyone.

Besides vanilla, this protein powder also comes in rich chocolate, red velvet cake, natural-no stevia, and cookies and cream flavors.

Price at time of publication: $53 ($1.77 per serving)

Key Specs:
Protein source:
pea protein isolate, artichoke powder, organic sprouted amaranth and quinoa powders, whole algae protein, added amino acids | Serving size: 1 scoop (30 grams) | Protein per serving: 21 grams | Other ingredients: enzyme blend, natural flavor, stevia extract powder, organic tapioca powder, silica, guar gum powder, lucuma powder, monk fruit extract powder, yacon powder

Best for Men Over 50

Vega One All-in-One Shake, French Vanilla

Vega One All-in-One Shake, French Vanilla 29.2 oz

Amazon

Pros
  • A good source of many micronutrients

  • High in fiber

  • Source of omega 3’s

Cons
  • Expensive

Vega One’s All-in-One protein shake utilizes a combination of protein sources to offer all essential amino acids. It includes more common vegan proteins like pea protein, flaxseed, and hemp protein, but it also includes sacha inchi—a plant native to South America and the Caribbean. This plant is rich in protein, fiber, and omega 3’s. 

As a result of the plant combinations in this product, this protein powder is uniquely rich in fiber, containing 6 grams per serving. This can help older men meet the recommended 30 grams of fiber per day for promoting digestive health and reducing risk for chronic diseases like type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

Other nutrients important for older men to consume are calcium and vitamin D for bone health and potassium for high blood pressure management, which this protein powder also provides. In addition, this product contains a significant amount of many other micronutrients including iron, vitamin A, B vitamins, vitamin C, and vitamin K. 

We love that this protein powder provides so many nutrients that may benefit men over 50. However, it’s important to consult a healthcare professional before taking this supplement, especially if you take other supplements or medications

Price at time of publication: $62 ($3.10 per serving)

Key Specs:
Protein source:
pea protein, flaxseed, hemp protein, sacha inchi protein | Serving size: 1 scoop (40 grams) | Protein per serving: 20 grams | Other ingredients: pea starch, organic acacia gum, natural flavor, organic gelatinized maca root, organic broccoli, inulin, organic spirulina, organic kale, organic marine algae, dried fruit & vegetable blend, chlorella vulgaris, papain, probiotics, stevia leaf extract, citric acid, dried antioxidant fruit blend

How We Select Supplements

Our team works hard to be transparent about why we recommend certain supplements; you can read more about our dietary supplement methodology here. 

We support supplements that are evidence-based and rooted in science. We value certain product attributes that we find to be associated with the highest-quality products.

It's important to note that the FDA does not review dietary supplements for safety and effectiveness before they go to market. Our team of experts has created a detailed, science-backed methodology to choose the supplements we recommend.

What to Look for

Supplements that are third-party tested are sent to a lab, where they are tested to ensure they contain what they say they contain and are not contaminated with specific high-risk, common contaminants. However, it’s important to note:

  1. Third-party testing does not test to see whether a product is effective or safe for everyone, and it does not ensure that the supplement will not interact with other supplements or medications.
  2. Not all third-party testing is created equal. It is not uncommon for supplement companies to pay labs for certificates after conducting minimal to no testing. 
  3. The third-party certifications we trust are: ConsumerLab.com, NSF, and USP. However, these certifications are difficult to obtain and/or expensive for manufacturers, so many companies choose not to get their products tested by one of these three organizations. 
  4. Sometimes products tested by these three companies are more expensive, to try to offset the cost they pay for certification.
  5. Just because a supplement is not tested by one of these three companies, that does not mean it’s a bad product. We recommend doing some research on the reputability of the manufacturer, and calling up the manufacturer and their testing lab to determine their protocols and decide whether you feel comfortable consuming the supplement.

Protein powders may contain trace amounts of heavy metals, especially those that are plant-based, likely related to plants’ uptake of heavy metals through the air, water, and soil. However, the levels found in protein powders have not been found to be harmful when consumed in moderation. Purchasing third-party-tested products helps to ensure that they do not contain harmful levels of heavy metals.

Form

Protein powders come in a variety of forms. They can be plant-based, using pea, soy, hemp, nuts, or seeds; or they can be animal-based, using whey, casein, egg, or collagen. Pea, soy, casein, whey, and egg proteins are all complete sources of protein, meaning that they contain all nine essential amino acids that our bodies can’t produce on their own. 

Some protein powders contain combinations of plant-based proteins that together contain all essential amino acids. According to the International Society of Sport Nutrition (ISSN), whey protein may be digested more rapidly and thereby promote optimal muscle protein synthesis for athletes. However, soy protein is another complete protein and has been shown to promote muscle protein synthesis, particularly when consumed throughout the day, and especially around a workout.

Protein powders can be found in isolated, concentrated, or hydrolysated form, each of which have a different content of macronutrients and different ease of absorption by our bodies. When it comes to whey protein, this also affects the lactose content. 

Meléndez says, “If you have lactose intolerance, you may experience some discomfort [with whey protein]. Some are sensitive to lactalbumin. If this is you, look to utilize hydrolyzed whey. This is pre-digested, so it has almost no lactose.”

Ingredients and Potential Interactions

It is essential to read the ingredient list and nutrition facts panel of a supplement carefully, to know which ingredients are present and how much of each ingredient is included, relative to the recommended daily value of each one. Please take the supplement label to a healthcare provider to review the different ingredients contained in the supplement and any potential interactions between these ingredients and other supplements and medications you are taking. 

Protein powders can contain added sweeteners, flavors, stabilizers, allergens, or performance enhancers. Reading the ingredient list and purchasing third-party-tested products whenever possible can help you avoid consuming a product that aggravates intolerances or contains ingredients you want to avoid. 

Dosage

Always speak with a healthcare professional before adding a supplement to your routine to ensure that the supplement is appropriate for your individual needs and to understand which dosage to take. 

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend that sedentary adults consume 0.8 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight each day. For a 150-pound individual, that means 55 grams of protein, and for a 200-pound individual, it means 73 grams of protein. However, this can vary greatly, based on your physical activity level or whether you have other medical conditions that affect protein needs. For a competitive athlete, protein needs can reach 1.4 to 2 grams per kilogram of body weight, which is why protein powders can particularly be beneficial for athletes.

We recommend getting your nutrition—including protein—from a variety of food-based sources. While protein powder can contribute to meeting your protein needs, you want to incorporate a variety of protein foods regularly, as they provide many other important nutrients.

How Much Protein Powder Is Too Much?

While there is no tolerable upper limit (UL) for protein, research has shown that consuming over 2 grams per kilogram long-term can result in renal, vascular, and digestive abnormalities. Researchers have proposed an upper limit of 3.5 grams per kilogram of body weight. 

There are other risks of consuming too much protein powder, which include:

  • Digestive upset
  • Over-consumption of heavy metals
  • Inadequate consumption of carbohydrates and fats

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Do whey or soy protein powders affect male hormones?

    Despite some confusion, neither of these protein types has been shown to affect male hormones. Research has shown that soy isoflavones—components in soy that have estrogen-like properties— do not significantly alter testosterone production in men. 

    Soy protein isolate is considered safe for men to eat without experiencing feminizing effects. Meléndez even says, “Soy is actually one of the best protein sources out there, due to the leucine content.” The same is true for whey protein. Studies have shown no impact on testosterone in men who consume whey protein.

  • Does using protein powder help with weight loss?

    Weight is impacted by a combination of lifestyle, systemic, and genetic factors. It’s important to keep in mind—regardless of weight—how your food choices are impacting your overall health. 

    Research has shown that focusing on health-promoting behaviors, rather than weight, helps to improve health outcomes regardless of weight change. Protein powder can help you up your protein intake, promote satiety, and refuel after strength-training workouts.

  • Is it safe to drink protein powder every day?

    While drinking protein powder daily likely won’t pose any serious safety issues, there are some risks. If you are consuming a product that isn’t third-party tested, you may be unknowingly consuming harmful substances on a regular basis. 

    Even if you are consuming a product that is third-party tested, dietary variety is key. Mora says, “For those who opt to use protein powder, make sure most of your daily protein intake comes from real food.” Consuming a variety of whole foods is important for nutritional balance. Leaning too heavily on protein powder may result in inadequate consumption of fats, carbohydrates, and important micronutrients.

  • What is the best type of protein powder to use?

    The best type of protein powder to use depends on your goals and your lifestyle. There is no single protein powder choice that is best for everyone. We recommend choosing one that fits your health needs and dietary preferences and that tastes good to you!

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