The Best Gummy Vitamins, According to a Dietitian

Our top pick is SmartyPants Adult Formula Gummies

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The Best Gummy Vitamins, According to a Dietitian

Verywell / Chloe Jeong

While many people do not need a multivitamin supplement, one can be helpful when you aren't able to get the nutrients you need from your diet alone. This could be due to dietary restrictions, increased nutrient needs due to a life stage like pregnancy, or a health condition. Gummy vitamins can be particularly helpful for those who have trouble swallowing pills or difficulty remembering to take regular supplements.

When looking to buy gummy vitamins, here are some things that Registered Dietitian Lauren Manaker, MS, RDN, LD, CLEC, CPT, author of "Fueling Male Fertility," recommends keeping in mind. "If a person is limiting their added sugar intake, they should be aware that many varieties do contain added sugars. Perhaps for people with diabetes, taking too many gummies may result in consuming too many added sugars at one time, resulting in a blood sugar spike. If a person is following a vegan lifestyle or follows Kosher dietary law, they should be aware that some varieties are made with gelatin."

Gummy versions of supplements are often missing certain nutrients that may be more easily found in capsules or pills, so be sure that the nutrients you need to supplement are included in the right doses before choosing a gummy option.

Verywell Fit Approved Gummy Vitamins

  • Best Overall: SmartyPants Adult Formula Gummies are allergy-friendly and NSF certified for contents. SmartyPants takes pride in their ingredient sourcing—the omega-3s come from sustainably sourced fish oil, and the gummies' color comes from organic turmeric and organic black carrot juice.
  • Best Budget: Nature Made Multi + Omega-3 Gummies are an affordable option without sacrificing quality. They are third-party verified by USP and a solid choice for those looking to supplement vitamins rather than minerals.

Always speak with a healthcare professional before adding a supplement to your routine to ensure that the supplement is appropriate for your individual needs and which dosage to take.

Are Gummy Vitamins Beneficial?

Gummy Vitamins aren't necessary for everyone, but there are certain situations where they can be a great fit.

  • People who have trouble swallowing pills. Gummy Vitamins offer an alternative way to meet nutrient needs without having to deal with capsules. If liquids or chewables aren't appealing, gummy vitamins can be a nice alternative for kids and adults alike.
  • People who forget to take their vitamins. If taking standard vitamins feels like a chore, switching to a more flavorful option like a gummy can be an easy way to make it a more interesting part of your daily routine.
  • Those with dietary restrictions. If your diet is limited because you have a food allergy or choose to avoid certain foods, you may need some extra help meeting your nutrient needs through a supplement. Vegans should opt for a gummy without gelatin.
  • Kids who need to take vitamins. When kids need to take vitamins, it is often much easier to get them to take gummies. Though most kids don't need supplements, pediatric Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and author Malina Malkani, MS, RDN, CDN, creator of Solve Picky Eating, notes that gummy vitamins may be worth considering for "kids who are plant-based, vegan or vegetarian, or missing entire food groups from the diet, kids who have food allergies or intolerances, and children with chronic health issues such as celiac disease, cystic fibrosis, and malabsorption issues."

Who May Not Benefit from a Gummy Vitamin?

If you eat a varied, omnivorous diet and do not experience any health conditions, you likely do not need a multivitamin supplement. However, if a healthcare provider has recommended a multivitamin, there are some cases where you should choose a non-gummy option.

  • Those with iron deficiency. Most gummy multivitamins do not contain iron or contain a very low dose because it is a bulkier mineral to include and has a taste that is trickier to mask. If you have low iron levels, opt for a multivitamin that includes this nutrient, or be sure to add on iron in another form.
  • People after bariatric surgery. The physical changes post-surgery require a higher dosage of nutrients than most gummy vitamins provide. Gummy vitamins are also often missing key minerals that are important in this population, such as iron and calcium.
  • People with diabetes. Since many gummy vitamins contain sugar, people who need to pay more attention to blood sugar levels like those with diabetes or PCOS may want to look for alternative options.

Best Overall: SmartyPants Adult Formula Gummies

SmartyPants Adult Complete

Courtesy of VitaminShoppe.com 

Pros
  • NSF certified

  • Contains omega-3s

  • No synthetic dyes

Cons
  • Contains 8 grams added sugar which may not be suitable for some

What do buyers say? 87% of 6,100+ Amazon reviewers rated this product 4 stars or above.

SmartyPants Adult Formula is a great option for someone hoping to supplement their diet in a tasty way. This pick earns top place because of the reliable quality. It is NSF certified, and every batch is third-party tested. They source their omega-3 fish oil from sustainable fisheries and use only small fish to lower the risk of mercury exposure. These gummies are also made from non-GMO ingredients and are free of the top allergens. To top it off, they use only natural colors like organic turmeric and organic black carrot juice.

SmartyPants does use gelatin, making it not suitable for vegans. The serving size is a bit larger at six gummies with 8 grams of added sugar, which may not be suitable for some, though this allows the company to fit in more nutrients, including a more robust dose of omega-3s and vitamin D, compared to some other brands.

Key Nutrients: Vitamin D, B vitamins, omega-3s | Servings Per Container: 30 | Serving Size: 6 gummies | Grams of Sugar: 8 grams

Best Budget: Nature Made Multivitamin + Omega-3 Gummies

Nature Made Multivitamin + Omega-3 Gummies

Walgreens

Pros
  • USP certified

  • Affordable

Cons
  • Low in minerals

If you're looking to add a gummy into your routine while maximizing cost savings, Nature Made Multivitamin + Omega-3s might be a good choice. You can trust the quality since it is USP certified, ensuring that the ingredients and manufacturing processes have been tested and verified.

In addition to vitamins A, Bs, C, D, and E, it also contains a small amount of omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA. However, you won't be able to rely on this gummy to meet your mineral needs. It contains no calcium, iron, magnesium, or selenium. The zinc dosage provides less than 50 percent of the RDA.

Nature Made uses glucose syrup, sugar, and natural flavors for taste. It also contains gelatin and the color additive carmine, so we don't recommend it if you are vegan.

Key Nutrients: Vitamin D, B vitamins, omega-3s | Servings Per Container: 70 | Serving Size: 2 gummies | Grams of Sugar: 4 grams

Best for Women: Garden of Life mykind Organics Women's Gummy Vitamins

Garden of Life mykind Organics Women's Gummy Vitamins

Courtesy of Amazon

Pros
  • Organic

  • Vegan

Cons
  • Not third-party tested for nutrient levels or contaminants

Garden of Life prides itself on providing a more natural option using whole food ingredients and minimizing additives. They use fruit purees and juices instead of syrups to sweeten the gummies. Because Garden of Life uses organic pectin instead of gelatin, this gummy is a good option for vegans and those keeping a Kosher diet. It's also certified organic and non-GMO.

NSF certifies that it is a gluten-free supplement. However, it is not third-party tested to verify ingredients and ensure there is no contamination.

Key Nutrients: Folate, vitamin D, iodine | Servings Per Container: 30 | Serving Size: 4 gummies | Grams of Sugar: 5 grams

Best Prenatal: SmartyPants Prenatal Formula Gummy

SmartyPants Prenatal Formula Gummy

SmartyPants

Pros
  • NSF certified

  • Methylated B vitamins

Cons
  • Missing some important prenatal nutrients

If you are pregnant, you may be especially interested in a gummy option when morning sickness and food aversions are kicking in. The SmartyPants prenatal is a pretty comprehensive option containing important prenatal nutrients such as folate, vitamin D, iodine, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12. The nutrients it does contain are in high-quality forms like the methylated B vitamins.

However, some nutrients don't meet the recommended levels. The gummies contain a small amount of choline (12 percent of the RDA for pregnancy) and DHA (less than 38 percent of the recommendation), which means you might have to add other supplements or make up for those in the diet. They are also entirely missing iron, magnesium, and calcium.

If you have gestational diabetes, you may want to pay extra attention to how these could fit into your day since they contain added sugar from organic cane sugar and organic tapioca syrup.

This prenatal is tested for purity by the Clean Label Project for contaminants and additives. It's also allergen-free, gluten-free, and does not use artificial colors or sweeteners. It does contain gelatin, so it is not vegan.

Key Nutrients: Folate, vitamin D, iodine | Servings Per Container: 30 | Serving Size: 4 gummies | Grams of Sugar: 6 grams

Best for Men: Olly Men's Multivitamin Gummy

Olly Men's Multivitamin Gummy

Courtesy of Amazon

Pros
  • NSF certified

  • Affordable

  • Olly is a certified B corp

Cons
  • Lower doses and quality forms of some nutrients

If you are looking to fill in the gaps of your diet with a great-tasting gummy, we recommend Olly Men's Multivitamin. It is NSF certified and provides a variety of nutrients that are beneficial for men's health, such as zinc, selenium, and coenzyme Q10, which may be particularly helpful for male fertility. However, food sources of these nutrients are still important because the doses in this gummy are below the recommended daily value.

Additionally, Olly uses the synthetic forms of some nutrients such as folic acid and B12 instead of the active forms, which may be less easily used by your body. It is sweetened with glucose syrup and beet sugar. If you are vegan, this multivitamin wouldn't be ideal because it does contain gelatin.

Key Nutrients: Vitamin D, vitamin E, CoQ10 | Servings Per Container: 45 | Serving Size: 2 gummies | Grams of Sugar: 2 grams

Best for Kids: SmartyPants Kids Formula Daily Gummy Multivitamin

SmartyPants Kids Complete Daily Gummy Vitamins

Courtesy of Amazon

Pros
  • NSF certified and ConsumerLab approved

  • Contains omega-3s

  • No synthetic dyes

Cons
  • Contains 5 grams added sugar which may not be suitable for some

We like this SmartyPants pick because it provides important nutrients that kids may be missing in their diets, such as vitamin D, iodine, and omega-3 fatty acids. It contains high-quality forms of the nutrients without a lot of additives like synthetic dyes or flavors. You can be confident in the quality and purity of this kids formula because it earned an NSF certification and the nutrient levels claimed on the bottle were tested and verified by ConsumerLab.

The gummies are also free of the top-9 allergens and gluten-free making this a safer option for many kids. It may be important to note that SmartyPants is sweetened with 5 grams of organic cane sugar and organic tapioca syrup, which may not be suitable for some, as it is 20 percent of the recommended daily added sugar limit for kids.

Key Nutrients: Vitamin D3, vitamin B12, omega-3s | Servings Per Container: 30 | Serving Size: 4 gummies | Grams of Sugar: 5 grams

Good to Know

There is a risk with any great-tasting, candy-like supplement that too many will be consumed, especially by children. To avoid potential overconsumption, keep gummy vitamins out of reach. Always read the label and do not consume more gummies than the recommended dose or the amount outlined by your healthcare practitioner.

Final Verdict

The SmartyPants Adult Formula is our favorite option for gummy vitamins. The quality assurance from extensive third-party testing is a big factor. It's a bit higher in added sugar, but it packs a punch with the nutrient content.

How We Select Supplements

Our team works hard to be transparent about why we recommend certain supplements. You can read more about our dietary supplement methodology here.

We support supplements that are evidence-based and rooted in science. We value certain product attributes that we find to be associated with the highest quality products. We prioritize products that are third-party tested and certified by one of three independent, third-party certifiers: USP, NSF, or ConsumerLabs.

It's important to note that the FDA does not review dietary supplements for safety and effectiveness before they go to market. Our team of experts has created a detailed, science-backed methodology to choose the supplements we recommend.

What to Look for in Gummy Vitamins

Third-Party Testing

Supplements that are third-party tested are sent to a lab where they are tested to ensure they contain what they say they contain and are not contaminated with specific high-risk, common contaminants. However, it's important to note:

  • Third-party testing does not test to see if a product is effective or safe for everyone, and it does not ensure the supplement will not interact with other supplements or medications.
  • Not all third-party testing is created equal. It is not uncommon for supplement companies to pay labs for certificates after conducting minimal to no testing.
  • The third-party certifications we can trust are ConsumerLab, NSF, and USP. However, these certifications are difficult to obtain and expensive for manufacturers, so many companies choose not to get their products tested by one of these three organizations.
  • Sometimes products tested by these three companies are more expensive to try to offset the cost they pay for certification.
  • Just because a supplement is not tested by one of these three companies does not mean it's a bad product. We recommend doing some research on the reputability of the manufacturer and calling the manufacturer and their testing lab to determine their protocols and decide if you feel comfortable consuming the supplement.

Choosing a gummy vitamin that is third-party tested is highly important. The ConsumerLab testing group found that gummy vitamins were more likely than other vitamins to contain unreliable levels of nutrients. Since the nutrients can degrade over time, companies may put in higher levels of certain nutrients to make up for potential losses. Some manufacturing processes (like spraying on the nutrients to a finished gummy product) could also yield much lower levels of nutrients in the gummy.

Ingredients and Potential Interactions

It is essential to carefully read the ingredient list and nutrition facts panel of a supplement to know which ingredients and how much of each ingredient is included relative to the recommended daily value of that ingredient. Please bring the supplement label to a healthcare provider to review the different ingredients contained in the supplement and any potential interactions between these ingredients and other supplements and medications you are taking.

Gelatin: Gelatin is a common ingredient in gummies to create the desired texture. It is made from animal bones and tissues and thus is not a vegan ingredient. Depending on the source and processing, it may not be considered Kosher either. If you are searching for a gelatin-free option, look for gummy products that use pectin instead.

Sweeteners: All gummy vitamins use some kind of sugar or alternative sweetener. People with certain health conditions like diabetes may want to pay closer attention to added sugar amounts and choose options that are lower in sugar. Additionally, some sweeteners, like sugar alcohols, may cause gastrointestinal discomfort, so note these ingredients if you are sensitive.

Gummy Vitamin Dosage

The dosage for the vitamins and minerals in a gummy supplement will vary by product. Although there isn't a standard dose for multivitamins, on the label, you will see that manufacturers use the daily values (DVs), dietary reference intakes (DRIs), or adequate intakes (AIs) to quantify dosing.

Some supplement companies add more than the recommended amount of certain vitamins and minerals, so take care to get your vitamin and mineral levels checked to make sure you are not exceeding your body's needs.

The ideal dosage for you will depend on your diet, life stage, and medical needs. Check with a healthcare provider to personalize a supplement choice that contains the nutrients most relevant for you.

How Much is Too Much?

Though vitamins and minerals are essential for health, you can have too much of a good thing. Children who mistake gummy vitamins for candy may overeat them, which will usually only lead to minor side effects like upset stomach and diarrhea. However, if the gummies contain iron or gummy vitamins are eaten in large quantities over an extended period of time, there is an increased risk of vitamin and mineral toxicity.

Nutrients to pay attention to:

Iron: Most gummy vitamins do not contain iron, but some do. If your gummy contains iron, take note that overconsumption of iron can lead to uncomfortable and potentially dangerous outcomes, including stomach discomfort and vomiting. When very high doses of iron are consumed (27 mg per pound), there is potential for organ failure, coma, and even death.

Fat-soluble vitamins: Vitamins A, D, E, and K are fat-soluble, which means they are stored in the fat tissue and liver. If you consume too much, the levels can accumulate in the body and lead to problematic outcomes.

  • Vitamin A: Too much vitamin A can cause joint pain, irritated skin, nausea, or more extreme liver damage and birth defects. Certain forms of vitamin A pose a higher risk of toxicity, such as retinol, retinyl acetate, and retinyl palmitate. Beta-carotene and carotenoids are less risky.
  • Vitamin D: Taking too much vitamin D can raise the calcium levels in the body too high, causing pain, dehydration, nausea, vomiting, kidney stones, or even kidney failure and heart disease. The Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL) for vitamin D is set at 4000 IUs, though the Food and Nutrition Board committee noted adverse symptoms are unlikely at intakes below 10,000 IUs. Getting blood levels tested to see actual vitamin D status is the most reliable way to determine risk for toxicity.
  • Vitamin E: Vitamin E toxicity appears to be less likely though still possible, especially from long-term excessive intake. The Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL) is set at 1000mg for adults. Risks include hemorrhage and stroke.
  • Vitamin K: Too much vitamin K has not been shown to be associated with toxicity risk.

Iodine: Iodine is a trace element that is vital for thyroid health. However, taking too much iodine can damage your thyroid. So it is important not to exceed the Tolerable Upper Intake Levels (ULs) for iodine of 1100mcg for adults.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Are gummy vitamins as effective as pills?

    Registered Dietitian Lauren Manaker cautions that not all gummy vitamins are equal to pills, "Some gummies can be as effective as capsules. Others may lose their effectiveness during processing. It can be challenging for manufacturers to get in large quantities of certain nutrients, so leaning on gummies may result in people not being provided with the right dose of a nutrient."

  • What happens if you eat too many gummy vitamins?

    Eating too many gummy vitamins can cause stomach upset and, in rare cases, can even be dangerous. This is particularly a concern with children who may not be able to distinguish between regular candies and the vitamins.

    Malkani says, "Over-consuming them can put kids at risk for vitamin and/or mineral toxicity, particularly of fat-soluble vitamins which are stored in body fat and tissue. It's essential for parents who keep gummy supplements on hand to supervise intake and store these supplements in child-proof containers, out of reach of children." Adults who eat too many gummy vitamins could run the same risk.

  • Why can't you have gummy vitamins after bariatric surgery?

    Because bariatric surgery changes how vitamins and minerals are absorbed in the body, nutrient needs are higher. Standard gummy vitamins are not recommended because they do not contain the high levels needed after surgery and are missing important minerals like iron and calcium.

  • Do gummy vitamins expire?

    The Food and Drug Administration does not require expiration dates for supplements. Companies may opt to include dates and are then required to provide accurate information that is supported by data.

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By Alexandra Paetow, MS, RDN
She is a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist with master’s degree in nutrition education from Teachers College Columbia University.Alexandra is the Founder of Thrive and Bloom Nutrition, a private practice specializing in maternal nutrition.She is the creator of @postpartumnutritionist, a social media account bringing attention to the importance of nutrition for new moms.She says, “Nutrition is more than nutrients. If we don’t address the relationship with food and body image, we are missing out on a critical component of nutrition especially in the prenatal and postpartum population as parents create lifestyles that influence not only their own wellbeing, but that of the next generation.”