1-Week Gluten-Free Meal Plan & Recipes

Homemade Quinoa Tofu Bowl

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At Verywell, we believe there is no one-size-fits-all approach to a healthy lifestyle. Successful eating plans need to be individualized and consider the whole person. Before starting a new diet plan, consult with a healthcare provider or a registered dietitian, especially if you have an underlying health condition.

A gluten-free diet is an eating pattern that excludes foods containing gluten. Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye, barley, and triticale. If you need to eat gluten-free due to celiac, gluten sensitivity, or another condition, it can be helpful to plan ahead and have a balanced meal plan, especially when weeks get busy. A meal plan can help ensure you are eating a balance of foods that fit into a gluten-free eating pattern.

Meal planning can help keep you on track, no matter what your nutrition goal is. Prepping and planning doesn’t have to be time-intensive and complicated. A few simple steps, including basic meal constructs, making a shopping list, shopping strategically, and methodically preparing food ahead of time, are what make meal planning a helpful tool to keep you energized, meet your nutrition goals, reduce food waste, and save money.

Why Nutrition Is Important for a Gluten-Free Diet

A gluten-free diet excludes foods that contain the protein gluten, such as wheat and rye products. Gluten-free diets are essential for individuals with celiac disease, however, other health conditions may benefit from decreasing or avoiding gluten as well.

Gluten comes from a family of proteins found in wheat, barley, rye, and spelt and gives flour a sticky consistency when mixed with water. This consistency gives bread the ability to rise when baked and gives it its chewy texture.

Some individuals experience gastrointestinal symptoms or distress after eating gluten-containing foods. Those diagnosed with celiac disease must avoid gluten as it can lead to intestinal damage. Other people may avoid gluten if they have non-celiac gluten sensitivity, gluten ataxia, or wheat allergies.

Gluten-free diets help treat digestive problems and symptoms that may include bloating, diarrhea, constipation, gas, and fatigue. Other health benefits include reducing chronic inflammation in those with celiac disease.

While there are a number of health benefits to a gluten-free diet and those with celiac disease must avoid gluten, there are some downsides to consider. Individuals with celiac disease are at risk for nutrient deficiencies including fiber, iron, calcium, zinc, folate, vitamin B12, and vitamin D.

Gluten-free products are often lower in protein and fiber and they are not fortified with B vitamins. A carefully planned gluten-free diet can help prevent any nutritional gaps.

7-Day Sample Menu

This one-week meal plan was designed for a person who needs about 2,000 calories per day and has no other dietary restrictions (besides eliminating gluten). Your daily calorie goal may vary. Learn what it is below, then make tweaks to the plan to fit your specific needs. Consider working with a registered dietitian or speaking with another healthcare provider to assess and plan for your dietary needs more accurately.

Each day includes three meals and three snacks, which contain a healthy balance of carbohydrates, protein, and fat appropriate for a gluten-free eating pattern. You will also get plenty of fiber and antioxidants from fruits, vegetables, gluten-free whole grains, and legumes.

It is OK to swap out similar menu items, but keep cooking methods in mind. Replacing grilled chicken with grilled fish is fine, but frying the chicken will result in a large caloric discrepancy. You can adjust your calorie intake by consuming fewer snacks or eating larger snacks depending on your goals.

Day 1

Breakfast

  • 1 cup 2% plain Greek yogurt
  • 1/4 cup gluten-free granola
  • 1/2 cup blueberries

Macronutrients: 289 calories, 23 grams protein, 36 grams protein, 7 grams fat

Snack

  • 1 medium banana
  • 1 tablespoon peanut butter

Macronutrients: 199 calories, 5 grams protein, 31 grams carbohydrates, 8 grams fat

Lunch

  • 1 cup lentil and vegetable soup
  • 5 ounces baked chicken

Macronutrients: 451 calories, 43 grams protein, 20 grams carbohydrates, 21 grams fat

For any packaged or prepared foods such as hemp seeds, oatmeal, pasta, and granola, you will want to double check the ingredients list to ensure that the food is gluten-free.

Snack

  • 1/2 cup baby carrots
  • 1/4 cup hummus

Macronutrients: 119 calories, 5 grams protein, 13 grams carbohydrates, 6 grams fat

Dinner

  • 4 ounces cooked shrimp
  • 1 cup cooked brown rice
  • 1/2 cup broccoli sauteed in 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons peanut sauce

Macronutrients: 592 calories, 34 grams protein, 61 grams carbohydrates, 23 grams fat

Snack

  • 2 cups plain popcorn
  • 1 ounce 70% dark chocolate

Macronutrients: 258 calories, 3 grams protein, 22 grams carbohydrates, 17 grams fat

Daily Totals: 1,908 calories, 113 grams protein, 183 grams carbohydrates, 83 grams fat

Note that beverages are not included in this meal plan. Individual fluid needs vary based on age, sex, activity level, and medical history. For optimal hydration, experts generally recommend drinking approximately 9 cups of water per day for women and 13 cups of water per day for men. When adding beverages to your meal plan, consider their calorie count. Aim to reduce or eliminate consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages, and opt for water when possible.

Day 2

Breakfast

  • 1/2 cup cooked oatmeal in water
  • 1 tablespoon hemp seeds
  • 1 tablespoon peanut butter
  • 1 medium sliced banana

Macronutrients: 337 calories, 11 grams protein, 46 grams carbohydrates, 15 grams fat

Snack

  • 15 almonds
  • 15 cherries

Macronutrients: 193 calories, 5 grams protein, 24 grams carbohydrates, 10 grams fat

Lunch

  • Greek Salad (2 cups romaine lettuce, 1/2 cup chopped tomato, 1/2 cup chopped cucumber, 1/4 cup black olives, 1/4 cup feta cheese, 1/2 cup chickpeas, and 2 tablespoons balsamic vinaigrette)

Macronutrients: 383 calories, 15 grams protein, 38 grams carbohydrates, 20 grams fat

Snack

  • One cucumber, sliced
  • 3 tablespoons tzaztiki

Macronutrients: 83 calories, 4 grams protein, 12 grams carbohydrates, 2 grams fat

Dinner

  • 1 1/2 cups lentil pasta
  • 1/2 cup tomato sauce
  • 1/2 cup broccoli roasted with 1 tablespoon olive oil

Macronutrients: 494 calories, 26 grams protein, 55 grams carbohydrates, 21 grams fat

Snack

  • Three Medjool dates
  • 2 tablespoons almond butter

Macronutrients: 396 calories, 8 grams protein, 60 grams carbohydrates, 18 grams fat

Daily totals: 1,886 calories, 69 grams protein, 235 grams carbohydrates, 86 grams fat

Day 3

Breakfast

  • 1 slice gluten-free toast
  • 1 poached egg
  • 1/2 avocado

Macronutrients: 316 calories, 10 grams protein, 23 grams carbohydrates, 22 grams protein

Snack

  • 1 large peach
  • 1 ounce cheddar cheese

Macronutrients: 183 calories, 8 grams protein, 18 grams carbohydrates, 10 grams fat

Lunch

  • Quinoa salad with 1 cup cooked quinoa, 1/4 cup dried cranberries, 1/4 cup feta cheese, and 1/4 cup chopped pecans

Macronutrients: 632 calories, 16 grams protein, 78 grams carbohydrates, 32 grams fat

Snack

  • Four slices dried mango
  • 1/4 cup pumpkin seeds

Macronutrients: 205 calories, 4 grams protein, 42 grams carbohydrates, 4 grams fat

Dinner

  • 4 ounces grilled salmon
  • 1 medium baked sweet potato
  • Eight asparagus spears roasted in 1 tablespoon olive oil

Macronutrients: 482 calories, 30 grams protein, 28 grams carbohydrates, 28 grams fat

Snack

  • 1 cup gluten-free coconut milk ice cream

Macronutrients: 290 calories, 5 grams protein, 29 grams carbohydrates, 18 grams fat

Daily Totals: 2,108 calories, 73 grams protein, 218 grams carbohydrates, 114 grams fat

Day 4

Breakfast

  • 1 cup 2% plain Greek yogurt
  • 1 tablespoon hemp seeds
  • 1/4 cup gluten-free granola
  • 1/2 cup raspberries

Macronutrients: 334 calories, 26 grams protein, 34 grams carbohydrates, 12 grams fat

Snack

  • 1 medium banana
  • 1 tablespoon peanut butter

Macronutrients: 199 calories, 5 grams protein, 31 grams carbohydrates, 8 grams fat

Lunch

  • 2 cups vegetarian bean chili

Macronutrients: 304 calories, 16 grams protein, 57 grams carbohydrates, 4 grams fat

Snack

  • One red bell pepper, cut into slices
  • 1/4 cup guacamole
  • 12 corn tortilla chips

Macronutrients: 292 calories, 5 grams protein, 37 grams carbohydrates. 16 grams fat

Dinner

  • 4 ounces grilled chicken breast
  • 1 cup quinoa
  • 1 cup cauliflower roasted in 1 tablespoon olive oil

Macronutrients: 538 calories, 44 grams protein, 45 grams carbohydrates, 21 grams fat

Snack

  • 2 cups plain popcorn
  • 1 ounce 70% dark chocolate

Macronutrients: 258 calories, 3 grams protein, 22 grams carbohydrates, 17 grams fat

Daily Totals: 1,925 calories, 99 grams protein, 226 grams carbohydrates, 78 grams fat

Day 5

Breakfast

  • 1/2 cup cooked oatmeal in water
  • 1 tablespoon peanut butter
  • 1 small chopped apple
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon

Macronutrients: 261 calories, 7 grams protein, 41 grams carbohydrates, 10 grams fat

Snack

  • Eight walnuts
  • 1 large peach

Macronutrients: 174 calories, 4 grams protein, 19 grams carbohydrates, 11 grams fat

Lunch

  • 1 cup cooked brown rice
  • 1/2 cup black beans
  • 1/2 red bell pepper and 1/2 onion, sliced and sauteed in 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/4 cup salsa
  • 1/2 avocado

Macronutrients: 668 calories, 17 grams protein, 87 grams carbohydrates, 31 grams fat

Snack

  • 1/2 cup baby carrots
  • 1/4 cup hummus

Macronutrients: 119 calories, 5 grams protein, 13 grams carbohydrates, 6 grams fat

Dinner

  • 3 ounces chicken
  • 1 cup rice noodles
  • 1/2 cup broccoli
  • 2 tablespoons peanut sauce

Macronutrients: 497 calories, 28 grams protein, 56 grams carbohydrates, 18 grams fat

Snack

  • Three Medjool dates
  • 2 tablespoons almond butter

Macronutrients: 396 calories, 8 grams protein, 60 grams carbohydrates, 18 grams fat

Daily Totals: 2,115 calories, 69 grams protein, 276 grams carbohydrates, 94 grams fat

Day 6

Breakfast

  • 1 baked medium sweet potato
  • 1 cup lower-sugar vanilla Greek yogurt
  • 2 tablespoons almond butter

Macronutrients: 445 calories, 29 grams protein, 38 grams carbohydrates, 22 grams fat

Snack

  • One string cheese
  • 1 large peach

Macronutrients: 153 calories, 8 grams protein, 17 grams carbohydrates, 7 grams fat

Lunch

  • One 5-ounce can tuna mixed with 1/4 avocado
  • 2 cups shredded romaine lettuce
  • 5 grape tomatoes, cut in half
  • 2 tablespoons balsamic vinaigrette

Macronutrients: 394 calories, 43 grams protein, 12 grams carbohydrates, 19 grams fat

Snack

  • 12 corn tortilla chips
  • 1/4 cup guacamole

Macronutrients: 260 calories, 4 grams protein, 30 grams carbohydrates, 16 grams fat

Dinner

  • 3 ounces grilled steak
  • 1/2 cup butternut squash cubes roasted in 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 12 Brussels sprouts, halved and roasted in 1 tablespoon olive oil

Macronutrients: 607 calories, 30 grams protein, 29 grams carbohydrates, 44 grams fat

Snack

  • 10 walnut halves
  • 1 ounce 70% dark chocolate

Macronutrients: 302 calories, 5 grams protein, 16 grams carbohydrates, 25 grams fat

Daily Totals: 2,161 calories, 119 grams protein, 142 grams carbohydrates, 133 grams fat

Day 7

Breakfast

  • 2 egg omelet with 1 cup spinach, 1/4 cup chopped tomatoes cooked in 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 cup roasted potatoes cooked in 1 tablespoon olive oil

Macronutrients: 544 calories, 21 grams protein, 35 grams carbohydrates, 37 grams fat

Snack

  • 1 small apple
  • 1 tablespoon peanut butter

Macronutrients: 172 calories, 4 grams protein, 24 grams carbohydrates, 8 grams fat

Lunch

  • Greek Salad (2 cups romaine lettuce, 1/2 cup chopped tomato, 1/2 cup chopped cucumber, 1/4 cup black olives, 1/4 cup feta cheese, 1/2 cup chickpeas, and 2 tablespoons balsamic vinaigrette)

Macronutrients: 383 calories, 15 grams protein, 38 grams carbohydrates, 20 grams fat

Snack

  • 1/2 cup baby carrots
  • 1/4 cup hummus

Macronutrients: 119 calories, 5 grams protein, 13 grams carbohydrates, 6 grams fat

Dinner

  • 4 ounces ground turkey
  • 1 cup lentil pasta
  • 1/2 cup tomato sauce
  • 1/2 cup steamed broccoli

Macronutrients: 561 calories, 47 grams protein, 41 grams carbohydrates, 25 grams fat

Snack

  • Three Medjool dates
  • 2 tablespoons almond butter

Macronutrients: 396 calories, 8 grams protein, 60 grams carbohydrates, 18 grams fat

Daily Totals: 2,175 calories, 100 grams protein. 211 grams carbohydrates, 114 grams fat

How to Meal Plan for a Gluten-Free Diet

  • Start your day with a balanced breakfast. Be sure to include plenty of protein, healthy fats, and fiber in breakfast to keep you full and satisfied.
  • Plan ahead and meal prep. Taking time on a Sunday or your day off to plan your meals for the week, grocery shop, and prep some meals in advance is a major time saver during busy weeks. It can also help reduce stress when thinking about what to eat and helps you stay on track.
  • Keep your food groups in mind. It can be challenging to come up with meals every day. To make it easier, think about including a protein, carbohydrate, fat, and fruit or vegetable at each meal. This combination helps you get all of the nutrients you need and keeps you full and satisfied.
  • Remember mid-morning, afternoon, and evening snacks are optional. If you are not hungry for snacks in between meals, you don't need to force yourself to eat them. However, snacks are a useful tool to keep your blood sugar stable throughout the day and prevent overeating at meals.
  • Compile a list of go-to resources for gluten-free friendly food. It can be helpful to have a list of grocery stores that stock a good variety of gluten-free options and a list of gluten-free food products that you can make sure to have on hand. This way you know you will always have gluten-free options with you.


A Word From Verywell

Planning nutritious, tasty, and balanced gluten-free meals does not need to be difficult with a little planning ahead and prep. Consider speaking with a health care provider or a registered dietitian to get specific recommendations for your individual nutrition needs and health goals.

We recognize that meal plans may not be appropriate for all, especially those with disordered eating habits. If you or a loved one are coping with an eating disorder, contact the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) Helpline for support at 1-800-931-2237.

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Verywell Fit uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.
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